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Post Consumer Fiber Paper


Every ton (about 40 cartons) of 30% postconsumer content copier paper saves the equivalent of 7.2 trees

Source: ConservaTreenon government site opens in new window


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Post-Consumer

Post-consumer content is an end product that has completed its life cycle as a consumer item and rather than being sent to the landfill, it is diverted by reusing the material in a new product. Examples of items that may include post-consumer content are office paper, cardboard, aluminum cans, plastics and metals.  By recycling materials that have served their intended use, new products can be made.   For example, a plastic bottle can become carpet backing by placing it in a recycling bin.  It’s just as important to purchase materials that contain recycled content as it is to recycle.

Whole Building Design Guide | Evaluating and Selecting Green Productsnon government site opens in new window

EPA | Recycling Basicsopens in new window

Recycling

Glass, plastic, aluminum, cardboard and paper (including glossy magazines, envelopes with plastic windows and sticky notes) can all be easily recycled.  Depending on the waste hauler, recycling bins can include commingled waste (i.e. all materials are collected in one bin) or they may require separated waste (i.e. one bin for paper, one bin for plastics, etc).  By recycling products, materials are sent back to the marketplace rather than to the landfill. 

EPA | Recycling Basicsopens in new window

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Did You Know?

Between 1950 and 2000, the U.S. population nearly doubled. However, in that same period, public demand for water more than tripled. Americans now use an average of 100 gallons of water each day—enough to fill 1,600 drinking glasses. Source: EPA WaterSenseopens in new window

Reduce water use with SFTool  


Case Study

Flexible Workplace Design

AWL Workstations

Today’s workplaces are often in flux. Organizations change direction or develop new services. People move to new spaces and take on new responsibilities. Teams form and re-form. The spaces themselves are transformed to meet these new needs. These changes are much easier to accommodate, when the workplace design supports flexibility.

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