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Smart Thermostats

Last Updated: 09/18/17

A device that controls heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment to regulate the temperature of the room or space in which it is installed, and has the ability to communicate with sources external to the HVAC system.

Life Cycle Cost Savings

According to EPA's ENERGY STAR Program, the average consumer using an ENERGY STAR certified smart thermostat will save more than 8% of their heating and cooling energy, amounting to approximately $50 annually. If all thermostatically controlled heating and cooling in the US achieved savings of this level, it would total 56 trillion BTU and offset 13 billion pounds of greenhouse gas emissions, equivalent to the emissions of 1.2 million motor vehicles each year.

Guiding Principles
Contributes to meeting The Guiding Principles for High Performance and Sustainable Buildings
Additional Guidance

In January of 2017, EPA finalized the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Connected Thermostats specification.  Included in the specification are products that meet the definition of "connected" or "smart" product as specified by the Energy Star program. These products provided as part of a larger product offering, such as a home security system, may be certified but will be subject to specific labeling requirements. Smart thermostats products that are unable to collect the required data for the energy savings metric as required by Energy Star and line voltage thermostats are excluded from the specification.

 

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