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Food Storage

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Design Guidance

Overall Strategies

Food must be stored properly to ensure the quality and safety of the item over it's edible life. Fresh and pasteurized foods require refrigerated storage. Dry goods do not require refrigeration, but should be kept in airtight containers to ensure freshness and minimize infiltration by vermin.

Freezer

Walk-in and reach-in freezers should have fully-gasketed doors to fully contain the cold air within, and walls should be adequately insulated. When available, select units that carry the Energy Star label for energy efficiency. Look for freezer equipment that does not use chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based refrigerants which deplete the ozone. Freezers may be connected to back-up power supplies such as generators to preserve food during power outages.

Refrigerator

Walk-in and reach-in refrigeration units should have fully-gasketed doors to fully contain the cold air within, and walls should be adequately insulated. When available, select units that carry the Energy Star label for energy efficiency. Look for refrigeration equipment that does not use chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based refrigerants which deplete the ozone. Freezers may be connected to back-up power supplies such as generators to preserve food during power outages.

Dry Storage

Dry food storage should be provided off the room floor on shelves or racks that can be easily cleaned. Food should be stored in air-tight containers.

Hot Food Holding Cabinets

Warming cabinets can be stationary or mobile carts that are plugged into convenience outlets, and generally have multiple racks to keep several trays of food warmed to the same temperature. When not in use, warming cabinets should be turned off or unplugged to conserve energy.

Under Counter Refrigeration

Under-counter refrigeration units should have fully-gasketed doors to fully contain the cold air within, and walls should be adequately insulated. When available, select units that carry the Energy Star label for energy efficiency. Look for refrigeration equipment that does not use chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based refrigerants which deplete the ozone.

Best Practices

  • Select temperature settings that balance food safety needs with energy conservation efforts.
  • Use Energy Star rated and FEMP-designated appliances to reduce electricity consumption when in use and to reduce phantom plug load during off-hours. Alternatively, use only appliances that can be turned off completely when not in use.

Compare Food Storage Options

EB = Existing BuildingsNC = New Construction and Major Renovation

Federal Requirements

Guiding Principles