[Skip to Content]

Lighting

Return to Tenant Corridor

Design Guidance

Overall Strategies

Turning off overhead lighting and using flexible, energy-efficient task lighting over work areas not only saves energy, but can provide a more effective and comfortable lighting source for laboratory users. One risk with task lighting is that it can be inadvertently left by users after leaving the laboratory. Providing visual cues, such as signs or magnets, and verbal reminders when lights are left on will help users to establish good habits around use of task lighting. Learn more about lighting in Whole Building Systems.

 

Lighting Control Software

Lighting can be controlled using comprehensive software that offers some of the following tools. Load shedding controls will turn off nonessential lights when the software notes the electrical load reaching a specified threshold. Task tuning allows the software to respond to occupants' lighting needs based on the type of work being completed.

Green Tips

  • Use daylight sensor controls that turn off electric lighting in response to natural light levels to reduce energy consumption. When used in combination with occupant sensors, a sustainable lighting control program can have significant benefits.
  • Use sustainable lighting practices such as occupant sensors to decrease utility costs.
  • Limit the use of accent lighting to specific artwork, menu boards, and educational items to reduce energy consumption.
  • Incorporate daylighting or views to the outside to create an inviting, ascetically pleasing environment as natural light is usually preferred to artificial lighting.
  • Use direct-indirect lighting to contribute to an efficient lighting system.
  • Use efficient fluorescent or LED lamps as they do not give off as much heat as incandescent bulbs and have a long useful life.
  • Use efficient LED lighting where practical to reduce energy consumption and maintenance costs.
  • Use controls that dim or turn off electric lighting in response to natural light levels to reduce energy consumption.
  • Skylights and roof monitors allow natural light into a space, reducing the need for electric lighting during daytime hours and allowing full-spectrum light inside.
  • Incorporate daylighting or views to the outside to create an inviting, ascetically pleasing environment as natural light is usually preferred to artificial lighting.
  • Reduce lighting power density in open offices with an efficient layout of energy-efficient and high efficacy fixtures such as direct/indirect fluorescent and LEDs fixtures.
  • Vacancy sensors are especially effective in well-lit conference rooms.
  • Increase spacing of fixtures in corridors to conserve energy.
  • Use efficient LED task lighting to reduce energy consumption while providing occupants control of the light levels. Task lighting in general may allow for lower ambient lighting levels.
  • Choose moveable task lighting with a magnetic mount or an articulated arm to provide light where it is needed.
  • Choose high efficiency LEDs or use compact fluorescent bulbs in task lighting.
  • Leave overhead light levels low (e.g. 15 foot candles) or off and use task lighting on benches. Make task lighting the primary lighting source, rather than an optional or supplemental source.
  • Talk with lab users about turning off task lights when they are not needed. Provide visual cues, such as signs or magnets on or near task lights, to remind users to turn them off.
  • Use sustainable lighting practices such as occupant sensors to decrease utility costs. For open areas, sensors must be carefully placed to avoid overlap with neighboring areas.
  • Use sustainable lighting practices such as occupant sensors to decrease utility costs. Make sure to use ultrasonic sensors in obstructed rooms such as restrooms.
  • Use sustainable lighting practices such as occupant sensors to decrease utility costs. For spaces such as corridors with unpredictable but frequent use, consider controls which turn electric lighting down 50% or more when no occupants are present instead of turning it off entirely.

Compare Lighting Options

EB = Existing BuildingsNC = New Construction and Major Renovation

Federal Requirements

Guiding Principles

  • Environmentally Preferable Product ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order 13693 [EB, NC])
    Section: V. Reduce Environmental Impact of Materials

    Use products that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment over their lifecycle when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. A number of standards and ecolabels are available in the marketplace to assist specifiers in making environmentally preferable decisions. For recommendations, consult the Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers.

  • Energy Efficiency ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order <span>13693</span> [NC])
    Section: II. Optimize Energy Performance

    From the Guiding Principles for NC: “Employ strategies that minimize energy usage. Focus on reducing energy loads before considering renewable or clean and alternative energy sources. Use energy efficient products as required by statute.”
    Determining Compliance: “For new construction, ensure energy efficiency is 30% better than the current ASHRAE 90.1 standard. For modernization, ensure: (1) energy use is 20% below the fiscal year (FY) 2015 energy use Baseline, (2) energy use is 30% below the FY 2003 energy use baseline, (3) the building has an ENERGY STAR® rating of 75 or higher, or (4) for building types not in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, where adequate benchmarking data exists, the building is in the top quartile of energy performance for its building type. For new construction and modernization, use energy efficient products, as required by statute.”

  • Daylighting and Lighting Controls ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order <span>13693</span>&nbsp;[EB])
    Section: IV. Enhance Environmental Quality

    Guiding Principles for NC & EB: “Maximize opportunities for daylighting...except where not appropriate because of building function, mission, or structural constraints. Maximize the use of automatic dimming controls or accessible manual lighting controls, task lighting where life cycle cost-effective, and appropriate shade and glare control.”
    Determining Compliance: “Maximize opportunities for daylighting in regularly occupied space, automatic dimming controls or accessible manual controls, task lighting, and shade and glare control.”

  • Energy Efficiency ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order <span>13693</span> [EB])
    Section: II. Optimize Energy Performance

    From the Guiding Principles for EB: “Employ strategies that minimize energy usage. Focus on reducing energy loads before considering renewable or clean and alternative energy sources. Use energy efficient products as required by statute.”
    Determining Compliance: “Ensure: (1) the building has an ENERGY STAR rating of 75 or higher, (2) energy use is 20% below the FY 2015 energy use baseline, (3) energy use is 30% below the FY 2003 energy use baseline, or (4) energy efficiency is 30% better than the current ASHRAE 90.1 standard. Use energy efficient products, as required by statute.”

  • Commissioning ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order 13693 [EB])
    Section: I. Employ Integrated Assessment, Operation, and Management/Design Principles

    From the Guiding Principles for EB: "Meet the commissioning requirements of Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 section 432 and Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) guidance. Employ recommissioning, tailored to the size and complexity of the building and its system components, in order to optimize and verify performance of building systems. Recommissioning should be led by an experienced commissioning agent who is independent of the facility operations team. Building recommissioning should include a commissioning plan, verification of the performance of systems being commissioned, and a commissioning report that confirms identified issues were appropriately addressed."
    Determining Compliance: "Commissioning reports for certification purposes must be completed within two years prior to certification date. Recommissioning should be completed at least every four years thereafter to optimize building performance. Use commissioning agents who are independent of the design and construction or operating team. Commissioning should be consistent with EISA section 4327 and FEMP commissioning guidance."

    DOE EERE - Commissioning for Federal Facilities
    DOE - Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities.

  • Commissioning ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order <span>13693</span> [NC])
    Section: Section: I. Employ Integrated Design Principles

    From the Guiding Principles for NC: "Employ commissioning tailored to the size and complexity of the building and its system components in order to optimize and verify performance of building systems. Commissioning should be led by an experienced commissioning provider who is independent of the project design and construction team and the operations team. At a minimum, commissioning should include a commissioning plan, verification of the installation and performance of systems being commissioned, and a commissioning report that confirms identified issues were appropriately addressed. Follow Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 section 432 and associated Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) commissioning guidance.”
    Determining Compliance: “Commission and recommission at least every 4 years to optimize building performance using commissioning agents who are independent of the design and construction or operating team. Commissioning should be consistent with EISA section 4321 and FEMP commissioning guidance.”

    DOE EERE - Commissioning for Federal Facilities
    DOE - Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities

  • Material Content and Performance ( Guiding Principles, Executive Order <span>13693</span>&nbsp;[EB])
    Section: V. Reduce the Environmental Impact of Materials

    From the Guiding Principles for EB: Procure construction materials, products, and supplies that have a “lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment over their life cycle when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose”, including:
    (i) “Use Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) section 6002 compliant products that meet or exceed EPA’s recycled content recommendations for building construction, modifications, operations, and maintenance.”
    (ii) “Per section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act (FSRIA), for USDA-designated products, use products with the highest content level per USDA’s biobased content recommendations.”
    (iii) “Purchase products that meet Federally Recommended Specifications, Standards and Ecolabels or are on the Federal Green Procurement Compilation.”
    (iv) Eliminate, to the maximum extent practicable, “ozone depleting compounds and high global warming potential (GWP) chemicals where EPA’s SNAP has identified acceptable substitutes or where other environmentally preferable products are available” during construction, repair, or replacement at the end of life.
    Determining Compliance: “Procure products that meet the following requirements where applicable: (A) RCRA section 6002, and (B) FSRIA section 9002, and (C) Federally Recommended Specifications, Standards and Ecolabels or are on the Federal Green Procurement Compilation for other green products, as appropriate, and (D) Avoid ozone depleting compounds and high GWP chemicals.”