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  • Sustainable Sites

    Choosing a building's site and managing that site during construction are important to ensure a project's sustainability. Environmentally responsibl...

Green Products

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Stormwater Management

When it rains, stormwater either infiltrates into the ground or flows directly into the storm system.  Pervious paving and landscaping allow water to be absorbed into the ground, percolating through natural filters and into aquifers.  Impervious surfaces, such as sidewalks and roofs, force storm water to flow directly into the storm drain.  This can lead to combined sewer overflow during times of significant rainfall.  Additionally, excess storm water may collect contaminants prior to entering the storm drain, and depending on the location, may drain into natural waterways without being treated.

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (§438) requires federal agencies to maintain the pre-development hydrology of the property with regard to the temperature, rate, volume, and duration of flow, to the maximum extent technically feasible. See EPA's 2009 technical guidanceopens in new window for more information.

https://www.epa.gov/greeningepa/epa-facility-stormwater-managementopens in new window

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (§438) requires federal agencies to maintain the pre-development hydrology of the property with regard to the temperature, rate, volume, and duration of flow, to the maximum extent technically feasible.  The requirements are contained in the 2009 EPA document titled “Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for Federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act

Whole Building Systems

Materials

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