[Skip to Content]

Executive Order 13693:
Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade

Instructions

Need help understanding Executive Order (EO) 13693? Want to know more about how to take action and turn your building into a high-performance building?

The Sustainable Facilities Tool can walk you through EO 13693. Click through the annotated text below for definitions, strategies, and links. You can also find the full text of the EO here.

For more information, check out the Implementing Instructions for EO 13693 issued by the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ).

You can also compare the goals and requirements of EO 13693 with previous ones here.

Hot Annotations

Hot annotations will appear in a popup window as you click links while exploring the document. Annotations contain valuable information about successfully putting policy into action.

  • Resources & Strategies
  • Definitions
  • Best Practices & Case Studies

Executive Order

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to maintain Federal leadership in sustainability and greenhouse gas emission reductions, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy
Executive departments and agencies (agencies) have been among our Nation's leaders as the United States works to build a clean energy economy that will sustain our prosperity and the health of our people and our environment for generations to come. Federal leadership in energy, environmental water, fleet, buildings, and acquisition management will continue to drive national greenhouse gas reductions and support preparations for the impacts of climate change. Through a combination of more efficient Federal operations such as those outlined in this Executive Order (order), we have the opportunity to reduce agency direct greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40 percent over the next decade while at the same time fostering innovation, reducing spending, and strengthening the communities in which our Federal facilities operate.
It therefore continues to be the policy of the United States that agencies shall increase efficiency and improve their environmental performance. Improved environmental performance will help us protect our planet for future generations and save taxpayer dollars through avoided energy costs and increased efficiency, while also making Federal facilities more resilient. To improve environmental performance and Federal sustainability, priority should first be placed on reducing energy use and cost, then on finding renewable or alternative energy solutions. Pursuing clean sources of energy will improve energy and water security, while ensuring that Federal facilities will continue to meet mission requirements and lead by example. Employing this strategy for the next decade calls for expanded and updated Federal environmental performance goals with a clear overarching objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions across Federal operations and the Federal supply chain.
Sec. 2. Agency Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions
In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the head of each agency shall, within 90 days of the date of this order, propose to the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) percentage reduction targets for agency-wide reductions of scope 1 and 2 and scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions in absolute terms by the end of fiscal year 2025 relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline. Where appropriate, the target shall exclude direct emissions from excluded vehicles and equipment and from electric power produced and sold commercially to other parties as the primary business of the agency. The proposed targets shall be subject to the review and approval of the Chair of CEQ in coordination with the Director of OMB under section 4(b) of this order.
Sec. 3. Sustainability Goals for Agencies
In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order and to achieve the goals of section 2 of this order, the head of each agency shall, where life-cycle cost-effective, beginning in fiscal year 2016, unless otherwise specified:
(a) promote building energy conservation, efficiency, and management by:
(i) reducing agency building energy intensity measured in British thermal units per gross square foot by 2.5 percent annually through the end of fiscal year 2025, relative to the baseline of the agency's building energy use in fiscal year 2015 and taking into account agency progress to date, except where revised pursuant to section 9(f) of this order, by implementing efficiency measures based on and using practices such as:
(A) using remote building energy performance assessment auditing technology;
(B) participating in demand management programs;
(C) ensuring that monthly performance data is entered into the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager for covered buildings;
(D) incorporating, where feasible, the consensus-based, industry standard Green Button data access system into reporting, data analytics, and automation processes;
(E) implementing space utilization and optimization practices and policies;
(F) identifying opportunities to transition test-bed technologies to achieve the goals of this section; and
(G) conforming, where feasible, to city energy performance benchmarking and reporting requirements; and
(ii) improving data center energy efficiency at agency facilities by:
(A) ensuring the agency chief information officer promotes data center energy optimization, efficiency, and performance;
(B) installing and monitoring advanced energy meters in all data centers by fiscal year 2018; and
(C) establishing a power usage effectiveness target of 1.2 to 1.4 for new data centers and less than 1.5 for existing data centers;
(b) ensure that at a minimum, the following percentage of the total amount of building electric energy and thermal energy shall be clean energy, accounted for by renewable electric energy and alternative energy:
(i) not less than 10 percent in fiscal years 2016 and 2017;
(ii) not less than 13 percent in fiscal years 2018 and 2019;
(iii) not less than 16 percent in fiscal years 2020 and 2021;
(iv) not less than 20 percent in fiscal years 2022 and 2023; and
(v) not less than 25 percent by fiscal year 2025 and each year thereafter;
(c) ensure that the percentage of the total amount of building electric energy consumed by the agency that is renewable electric energy is:
(i) not less than 10 percent in fiscal years 2016 and 2017;
(ii) not less than 15 percent in fiscal years 2018 and 2019;
(iii) not less than 20 percent in fiscal years 2020 and 2021;
(iv) not less than 25 percent in fiscal years 2022 and 2023; and
(v) not less than 30 percent by fiscal year 2025 and each year thereafter;
(d) include in the renewable electric energy portion of the clean energy target established in subsection (b) of this section renewable electric energy as defined in section 19(v) of this order and associated with the following actions, which are listed in order of priority:
(i) installing agency-funded renewable energy on site at Federal facilities and retaining corresponding renewable energy certificates (RECs) or obtaining equal value replacement RECs;
(ii) contracting for the purchase of energy that includes the installation of renewable energy on site at a Federal facility or off site from a Federal facility and the retention of corresponding RECs or obtaining equal value replacement RECs for the term of the contract;
(iii) purchasing electricity and corresponding RECs or obtaining equal value replacement RECs; and
(iv) purchasing RECs
(e) include in the alternative energy portion of the clean energy target established in subsection (b) of this section alternative energy as defined in section 19(c) of this order and associated with the following actions, where feasible:
(i) installing thermal renewable energy on site at Federal facilities and retaining corresponding renewable attributes or obtaining equal value replacement RECs where applicable;
(ii) installing combined heat and power processes on site at Federal facilities;
(iii) installing fuel cell energy systems on site at Federal facilities;
(iv) utilizing energy from new small modular nuclear reactor technologies;
(v) utilizing energy from a new project that includes the active capture and storage of carbon dioxide emissions associated with energy generation;
(vi) implementing other alternative energy approaches that advance the policy set forth in section 1 and achieve the goals of section 2 of this order and are in accord with any sustainability, environmental performance, and other instructions or guidance established pursuant to sections 4(e) and 5(a) of this order; and
(vii) including in the Department of Defense (DOD) accounting for alternative energy for this subsection, fulfillment of the requirements for DOD goals established under section 2852 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 as amended by section 2842 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010;
(f) improve agency water use efficiency and management, including stormwater management by:
(i) reducing agency potable water consumption intensity measured in gallons per gross square foot by 36 percent by fiscal year 2025 through reductions of 2 percent annually through fiscal year 2025 relative to a baseline of the agency's water consumption in fiscal year 2007;
(ii) installing water meters and collecting and utilizing building and facility water balance data to improve water conservation and management;
(iii) reducing agency industrial, landscaping, and agricultural (ILA) water consumption measured in gallons by 2 percent annually through fiscal year 2025 relative to a baseline of the agency's ILA water consumption in fiscal year 2010; and
(iv) installing appropriate green infrastructure features on federally owned property to help with stormwater and wastewater management;
(g) if the agency operates a fleet of at least 20 motor vehicles, improve agency fleet and vehicle efficiency and management by:
(i) determining, as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, the optimum fleet inventory with emphasis placed on eliminating unnecessary or non-essential vehicles from the agency's fleet inventory;
(ii) taking actions that reduce fleet-wide per-mile greenhouse gas emissions from agency fleet vehicles, relative to a baseline of emissions in fiscal year 2014, to achieve the following percentage reductions:
(A) not less than 4 percent by the end of fiscal year 2017;
(B) not less than 15 percent by the end of fiscal year 2021; and
(C) not less than 30 percent by the end of fiscal year 2025;
(iii) collecting and utilizing as a fleet efficiency management tool, as soon as practicable but not later than 2 years after the date of this order, agency fleet operational data through deployment of vehicle telematics at a vehicle asset level for all new passenger and light duty vehicle acquisitions and for medium duty vehicles where appropriate;
(iv) ensuring that agency annual asset-level fleet data is properly and accurately accounted for in a formal agency Fleet Management System and any relevant data is submitted to the Federal Automotive Statistical Tool reporting database, the Federal Motor Vehicle Registration System, and the Fleet Sustainability Dashboard (FleetDASH) system;
(v) planning for agency fleet composition such that by December 31, 2020, zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid vehicles account for 20 percent of all new agency passenger vehicle acquisitions and by December 31, 2025, zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid vehicles account for 50 percent of all new agency passenger vehicles and including, where practicable, acquisition of such vehicles in other vehicle classes and counting double credit towards the targets in this section for such acquisitions; and
(vi) planning for appropriate charging or refueling infrastructure or other power storage technologies for zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid vehicles and opportunities for ancillary services to support vehicle-to-grid technology;
(h) improve building efficiency, performance, and management by:
(i) ensuring, beginning in fiscal year 2020 and thereafter, that all new construction of Federal buildings greater than 5,000 gross square feet that enters the planning process is designed to achieve energy net-zero and, where feasible, water or waste net-zero by fiscal year 2030;
(ii) identifying, beginning in June of 2016, as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, a percentage of at least 15 percent, by number or total square footage, of the agency's existing buildings above 5,000 gross square feet that will, by fiscal year 2025, comply with the revised Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings (Guiding Principles), developed pursuant to section 4 of this order, and making annual progress toward 100 percent conformance with the Guiding Principles for its building inventory;
(iii) identifying, as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, a percentage of the agency's existing buildings above 5,000 gross square feet intended to be energy, waste, or water net-zero buildings by fiscal year 2025 and implementing actions that will allow those buildings to meet that target;
(iv) including in all new agency lease solicitations over 10,000 rentable square feet:
(A) criteria for energy efficiency either as a required performance specification or as a source selection evaluation factor in best-value tradeoff procurements; and
(B) requirements for building lessor disclosure of carbon emission or energy consumption data for that portion of the building occupied by the agency that may be provided by the lessor through submetering or estimation from pro-rated occupancy data, whichever is more cost-effective;
(v) reporting building energy, beginning in fiscal year 2016 as part of the agency scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions for newly solicited leases over 10,000 rentable square feet;
(vi) including in the planning for new buildings or leases cost-effective strategies to optimize sustainable space usage and consideration of existing community transportation planning and infrastructure, including access to public transit;
(vii) ensuring that all new construction, major renovation, repair, and alteration of agency buildings includes appropriate design and deployment of fleet charging infrastructure; and
(viii) including the incorporation of climate-resilient design and management elements into the operation, repair, and renovation of existing agency buildings and the design of new agency buildings;
(i) promote sustainable acquisition and procurement by ensuring that each of the following environmental performance and sustainability factors are included to the maximum extent practicable for all applicable procurements in the planning, award, and execution phases of the acquisition by:
(i) meeting statutory mandates that require purchase preference for:
(A) recycled content products designated by EPA;
(B) energy and water efficient products and services, such as ENERGY STAR qualified and Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)-designated products, identified by EPA and the Department of Energy (DOE); and
(C) BioPreferred and biobased designated products designated by the United States Department of Agriculture;
(ii) purchasing sustainable products and services identified by EPA programs including:
(A) Significant New Alternative Policy (SNAP) chemicals or other alternatives to ozone-depleting substances and high global warming potential hydrofluorocarbons, where feasible, as identified by SNAP;
(B) WaterSense certified products and services (water efficient products);
(C) Safer Choice labeled products (chemically intensive products that contain safer ingredients); and
(D) SmartWay Transport partners and SmartWay products (fuel efficient products and services);
(iii) purchasing environmentally preferable products or services that:
(A) meet or exceed specifications, standards, or labels recommended by EPA that have been determined to assist agencies in meeting their needs and further advance sustainable procurement goals of this order; or
(B) meet environmental performance criteria developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies consistent with section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) and OMB Circular A-119;
(iv) acting, as part of the implementation of planning requirements of section 14 of this order, until an agency achieves at least 95 percent compliance with the BioPreferred and biobased purchasing requirement in paragraph (i) of this subsection, to:
(A) establish an annual target for the number of contracts to be awarded with BioPreferred and biobased criteria and dollar value of BioPreferred and biobased products to be delivered and reported under those contracts in the following fiscal year. To establish this target, agencies shall consider the dollar value of designated BioPreferred and biobased products reported in previous years, the specifications reviewed and revised for inclusion of BioPreferred and biobased products, and the number of applicable product and service contracts to be awarded, including construction, operations and maintenance, food services, vehicle maintenance, and janitorial services; and
(B) ensure contractors submit timely annual reports of their BioPreferred and biobased purchases; and
(v) reducing copier and printing paper use and acquiring uncoated printing and writing paper containing at least 30 percent postconsumer recycled content or higher as designated by future instruction under section 4(e) of this order;
(j) advance waste prevention and pollution prevention by:
(i) reporting in accordance with the requirements of sections 301 through 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (42 U.S.C. 11001 through 11023);
(ii) diverting at least 50 percent of non-hazardous solid waste, including food and compostable material but not construction and demolition materials and debris, annually, and pursuing opportunities for net-zero waste or additional diversion opportunities;
(iii) diverting at least 50 percent of non-hazardous construction and demolition materials and debris; and
(iv) reducing or minimizing the quantity of toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials acquired, used, or disposed of, particularly where such reduction will assist the agency in pursuing agency greenhouse gas emission reduction targets established in section 2 of this order;
(k) implement performance contracts for Federal buildings by:
(i) utilizing performance contracting as an important tool to help meet identified energy efficiency and management goals while deploying life-cycle cost-effective energy efficiency and clean energy technology and water conservation measures;
(ii) fulfilling existing agency performance contracting commitments towards the goal of $4 billion in Federal performance-based contracts by the end of calendar year 2016; and
(iii) providing annual agency targets for performance contracting for energy savings to be implemented in fiscal year 2017 and annually thereafter as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order;
(l) promote electronics stewardship by establishing, measuring, and reporting by:
(i) ensuring procurement preference for environmentally sustainable electronic products as established in subsection (i) of this section;
(ii) establishing and implementing policies to enable power management, duplex printing, and other energy-efficient or environmentally sustainable features on all eligible agency electronic products; and
(iii) employing environmentally sound practices with respect to the agency's disposition of all agency excess or surplus electronic products.
Sec. 4. Duties of the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality
In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the Chair of CEQ shall:
(a) in coordination with the Director of OMB, establish a Federal Interagency Sustainability Steering Committee (Steering Committee) that shall advise the Director of OMB and the Chair of CEQ on the performance of agency responsibilities under sections 2 and 3 of this order and shall include the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer referenced in section 6 of this order and agency Chief Sustainability Officers designated under sections 7 and 8 of this order;
(b) in coordination with the Director of OMB review and approve agency-wide scope 1 and 2 and scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets developed under section 2 of this order;
(c) in coordination with the Director of OMB, prepare streamlined reporting metrics to determine each agency's progress under sections 2 and 3 of this order;
(d) review and evaluate each agency's Plan prepared under section 14 of this order;
(e) within 45 days of the date of this order and thereafter as necessary, after consultation with the Director of OMB, issue implementing instructions or other guidance to direct agency implementation of this order, other than instructions within the authority of the Director of OMB to issue under section 5 of this order;
(f) within 150 days of the date of this order, prepare and issue revised Guiding Principles for both new and existing Federal buildings including consideration of climate change resilience and employee and visitor wellness;
(g) revise, as necessary and in coordination with the Director of OMB, existing CEQ guidance and implementing instructions on Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities of September 15, 2011, Sustainable Practices for Designed Landscapes of October 31, 2011, as supplemented on October 22, 2014, Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance [Revision 1] of June 4, 2012, and Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514 of July 10, 2013;
(h) within 150 days of the date of this order, prepare and issue guidance to assist agencies in the implementation of section 13 of this order;
(i) identify annually, based on total contract spending in the previous fiscal year as reported in the Federal Procurement Data System, the seven largest Federal procuring agencies responsible for implementation of section 15(b) of this order;
(j) administer a Presidential leadership award program to recognize exceptional and outstanding performance and excellence in agency efforts to implement this order; and
(k) establish and disband, as appropriate, temporary interagency working groups to provide recommendations to the Chair of CEQ associated with the goals of this order, including: grid-based green power; data quality, collection, and reporting; greenhouse gas emissions associated with the transportation of Federal freight and cargo; sustainability considerations in resilience planning; agency supply chain climate vulnerability; recycled content paper; green infrastructure; and carbon uptake accounting and wood products.
Sec. 5. Duties of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget
In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the Director of OMB shall:
(a) issue, after consultation with the Chair of CEQ, instructions to the heads of agencies concerning periodic performance evaluation of agency implementation of this order, including consideration of the results from section 4(c) of this order;
(b) prepare scorecards providing periodic evaluation of Principal Agency performance in implementing this order and publish scorecard results on a publicly available website; and
(c) review and approve each agency's Plan prepared under section 14 of this order.
Sec. 6. Duties of the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer
Henceforth, the Federal Environmental Executive is reestablished as the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer and the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive is reestablished as the Office of the Chief Sustainability Officer, for which the Environmental Protection Agency shall provide funding and administrative support and that shall be maintained at CEQ. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer shall:
(a) monitor progress and advise the Chair of CEQ on agency goals in sections 2 and 3 of this order;
(b) chair, convene, and preside at quarterly meetings; determine the agenda; and direct the work of the Steering Committee;
(c) lead the development of programs and policies to assist agencies in implementing the goals of this order in coordination with DOE, EPA, the General Services Administration (GSA), and other agencies as appropriate;
(d) coordinate and provide direction to relevant existing workgroups through quarterly meetings to ensure that opportunities for improvement in implementation of this order are identified and addressed; and
(e) advise the Chair of CEQ on the implementation of this order.
Sec. 7. Duties of Principal Agencies
To ensure successful implementation of the policy established in section 1 of this order, the head of each Principal Agency shall:
(a) designate, within 45 days of the date of this order, an agency Chief Sustainability Officer, who shall be a senior civilian officer of the United States, compensated annually in an amount at or above the amount payable at level IV of the Executive Schedule, and report such designation to the Director of OMB and the Chair of CEQ;
(b) assign the designated official the authority to represent the agency on the Steering Committee established under section 4 of this order and perform such other duties relating to the implementation of this order within the agency as the head of the agency deems appropriate;
(c) prepare and distribute internally, where appropriate, performance evaluations of agency implementation of this order that reflect the contribution of agency services, components, bureaus, and operating divisions to the goals of this order;
(d) ensure, as soon as practicable after the date of this order, that leases and contracts entered into after the date of this order for lessor or contractor operation of Government-owned buildings or vehicles facilitate the agency's compliance with this order;
(e) implement opportunities to improve agency fleet sustainability, including vehicle acquisitions as established in section 3(g) of this order, waiver authority, and fleet data management practices, by revising agency fleet management review and approval procedures to include the Chief Sustainability Officers designated under this section and section 8 of this order;
(f) consider the development of policies to promote sustainable commuting and work-related travel practices for Federal employees that foster workplace vehicle charging, encourage telecommuting, teleconferencing, and reward carpooling and the use of public transportation, where consistent with agency authority and Federal appropriations law;
(g) ensure regional agency actions consider and are consistent with, sustainability and climate preparedness priorities of States, local governments, and tribal communities where agency facilities are located;
(h) foster outstanding performance and excellence in agency efforts to implement this order through opportunities such as agency leadership award programs;
(i) continue implementation of formal Environmental Management Systems (EMS) where those systems have proven effective and deploy new EMSs where appropriate; and
(j) notwithstanding the limitations on implementation in section 17 of this order, apply, where feasible and appropriate, the strategies and plans to achieve the goals of this order in whole or in part with respect to fueling, operation, and management of tactical or emergency vehicles and to the activities and facilities of the agency that are not located within the United States.
Sec. 8. Duties of Contributing Agencies
Within 45 days of the date of this order, to ensure successful implementation of the policy established in section 1 of this order, the head of each contributing agency shall designate an agency Chief Sustainability Officer, who shall be a senior civilian officer of the United States, compensated annually in an amount at or above the amount payable at level IV of the Executive Schedule, and report such designation to the Director of OMB and the Chair of CEQ.
Sec. 9. Duties of the Agency Chief Sustainability Officers
The Chief Sustainability Officers designated under sections 7 and 8 of this order shall be responsible for:
(a) ensuring agency policies, plans, and strategies implemented to achieve the goals of this order consider the role of agency regional facilities and personnel and are integrated into agency permitting and environmental review policies, programs, and planning;
(b) developing and implementing an agency-wide strategic process that coordinates appropriate agency functions and programs to ensure that those functions and programs consider and address the goals of this order;
(c) reporting annually to the Chair of CEQ and Director of OMB a comprehensive inventory of progress towards the greenhouse gas emissions goals established in section 2 of this order;
(d) representing the agency on the Steering Committee;
(e) convening quarterly meetings of agency bureaus, commands, or operating divisions that are responsible for the implementation of strategies necessary to meet the goals of this order;
(f) representing the agency in any requests to the Chair of CEQ and Director of OMB to amend or normalize a baseline for goals established in this order due to change of greater than 5 percent as a result of agency space consolidation, a change in mission tempo, or improved data quality;
(g) providing plans, including the Plan prepared under section 14 of this order, reports, information, and assistance necessary to implement this order, to the Director of OMB, the Chair of CEQ, and the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer; and
(h) performing such other duties relating to the implementation of this order as the head of the agency deems appropriate.
Sec. 10. Regional Coordination
Within 180 days of the date of this order, each EPA and GSA Regional office shall in coordination with Federal Executive Boards established by the Presidential Memorandum of November 10, 1961 (The Need for Greater Coordination of Regional and Field Activities of the Government), DOD and other agencies as appropriate, convene regional interagency workgroups to identify and address:
(a) sustainable operations of Federal fleet vehicles, including identification and implementation of opportunities to use and share fueling infrastructure and logistical resources to support the adoption and use of alternative fuel vehicles, including E-85 compatible vehicles, zero emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles, and compressed natural gas powered vehicles;
(b) water resource management and drought response opportunities;
(c) climate change preparedness and resilience planning in coordination with State, local, and tribal communities; and
(d) opportunities for collective procurement of clean energy to satisfy energy demand for multiple agency buildings.
Sec. 11. Employee Education and Training
Within 180 days of the date of this order, the Office of Personnel Management, in coordination with DOE, GSA, EPA, and other agencies as appropriate, shall:
(a) consider the establishment of a dedicated Federal occupational series for sustainability professionals and relevant positions that directly impact the achievement of Federal sustainability goals and if appropriate, prepare and issue such occupational series; and
(b) initiate the inclusion of environmental sustainability and climate preparedness and resilience into Federal leadership and educational programs in courses and training, delivered through electronic learning, in classroom settings, and residential centers, particularly developmental training for Senior Executive Service and GS-15 personnel.
Sec. 12. Supporting the Federal Fleet
(a) GSA shall ensure that vehicles available to agencies for either lease or sale, at or below market cost, through its vehicle program include adequate variety and volume of alternative fuel vehicles, including zero emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles, to meet the fleet management goals of this order.
(b) DOE shall assist the United States Postal Service (USPS) in evaluating the best alternative and advanced fuel technologies for the USPS fleet and report on such progress annually as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order.
Sec. 13. Supporting Federal Facility Climate Preparedness and Resilience
The head of each agency shall, consistent with Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013, ensure that agency operations and facilities prepare for impacts of climate change as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order and consistent with planning required under section 5 of Executive Order 13653 by:
(a) identifying and addressing projected impacts of climate change on mission critical water, energy, communication, and transportation demands and considering those climate impacts in operational preparedness planning for major agency facilities and operations; and
(b) calculating the potential cost and risk to mission associated with agency operations that do not take into account the information collected in subsection (a) of this section and considering that cost in agency decision-making.
Sec. 14. Agency Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan
Beginning in June 2015, and continuing through fiscal year 2025, the head of each Principal Agency shall develop, implement, and annually update an integrated Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (Plan) based on guidance prepared by the Chair of CEQ under section 4 of this order. Contributing agencies are encouraged to prepare a Plan but may limit content of the Plan to a summary of agency actions to meet the requirements of this order. Each Principal Agency Plan and update shall be provided to the Chair of CEQ and Director of OMB, shall be subject to approval by the Director under section 5 of this order, and shall be made publicly available on an agency website once approved.
Sec. 15. Supply Chain Greenhouse Gas Management
In implementing the greenhouse gas management policies in section 1 of this order and to better understand and manage the implications of Federal supply chain greenhouse gas emissions:
(a) the Chair of CEQ shall, within 30 days of the date of this order and annually thereafter, identify and publicly release an inventory of major Federal suppliers using publicly available Federal procurement information, including information as to whether the supplier has accounted for and publicly disclosed, during the previous calendar year, annual scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emission data and publicly disclosed a greenhouse gas emission reductions target (or targets) for 2015 or beyond; and
(b) the seven largest Federal procuring agencies shall each submit for consideration, in conjunction with the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, a plan to implement at least five new procurements annually in which the agency may include, as appropriate, contract requirements for vendors or evaluation criteria that consider contractor emissions and greenhouse gas emissions management practices. The plans submitted for consideration may include identification of evaluation criteria, performance period criteria, and contract clauses that will encourage suppliers to manage and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and shall be implemented as soon as practicable after any relevant administrative requirements have been met.
Sec. 16. Revocations and Conforming Provisions
(a) Pursuant to section 742(b) of Public Law 111-117, I have determined that this order will achieve equal or better environmental or energy efficiency results than Executive Order 13423. Therefore, Executive Order 13423 of January 24, 2007, is revoked.
(b) Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009; Presidential Memorandum of December 2, 2011 (Implementation of Energy Savings Projects and Performance-Based Contracting for Energy Savings); section 1 of Presidential Memorandum of February 21, 2012 (Driving Innovation and Creating Jobs in Rural America through Biobased and Sustainable Product Procurement); and Presidential Memorandum of December 5, 2013 (Federal Leadership on Energy Management), are revoked.
(c) Presidential Memorandum of May 24, 2011 (Federal Fleet Performance), is revoked as of October 1, 2015.
(d) Section 3(b)(vi) of Executive Order 13327 of February 4, 2004, is amended by striking "Executive Order 13148 of April 21, 2000" and inserting in lieu thereof "other Executive Orders".
(e) Section 2(d) of Executive Order 13432 of May 14, 2007, is amended to read as follows: "'greenhouse gases' means carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, nitrogen triflouride, and sulfur hexafluoride;".
(f) Section 5 of Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013, is amended by striking "Executive Order 13514" and inserting in lieu thereof "other Executive Orders".
(g) Section 1 of Executive Order 13677 of September 23, 2014, is amended by striking "Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009 (Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance), and Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013 (Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change)," and inserting in lieu thereof "Several Executive Orders have".
Sec. 17. Limitations
(a) This order shall apply to an agency with respect to the activities, personnel, resources, and facilities of the agency that are located within the United States. The head of an agency may provide that this order shall apply in whole or in part with respect to the activities, personnel, resources, and facilities of the agency that are not located within the United States, if the head of the agency determines that such application is in the interest of the United States.
(b) The head of an agency shall manage activities, personnel, resources, and facilities of the agency that are not located within the United States with respect to which the head of the agency has not made a determination under subsection (a) of this section in a manner consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this order to the extent the head of the agency determines practicable.
Sec. 18. Exemption Authority
(a) The Director of National Intelligence may exempt an intelligence activity of the United States, and related personnel, resources, and facilities, from the provisions of this order other than this subsection to the extent the Director determines necessary to protect intelligence sources and methods from unauthorized disclosure.
(b) The head of an agency may exempt law enforcement activities of that agency, and related personnel, resources, and facilities, from the provisions of this order other than this subsection to the extent the head of an agency determines necessary to protect undercover operations from unauthorized disclosure.
(c) The head of an agency may exempt law enforcement, protective, emergency response, or military tactical vehicle fleets of that agency from the provisions of this order other than this subsection. Heads of agencies shall manage fleets to which this paragraph refers in a manner consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this order to the extent they determine practicable.
(d) The head of an agency may exempt particular agency activities and facilities from the provisions of this order other than this subsection where it is in the interest of national security. If the head of an agency issues an exemption under this section, the agency must notify the Chair of CEQ in writing within 30 days of issuance of the exemption under this subsection. To the maximum extent practicable, and without compromising national security, each agency shall strive to comply with the purposes, goals, and implementation steps in this order.
(e) The head of an agency may submit to the President, through the Chair of CEQ, a request for an exemption of an agency activity, and related personnel, resources, and facilities, from this order.
Sec. 19. Definitions
As used in this order:
(a) "absolute greenhouse gas emissions" means total greenhouse gas emissions without normalization for activity levels and includes any allowable consideration of sequestration;
(b) "agency" means an executive agency as defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code, excluding the Government Accountability Office;
(c) "alternative energy" means energy generated from technologies and approaches that advance renewable heat sources, including biomass, solar thermal, geothermal, waste heat, and renewable combined heat and power processes; combined heat and power; small modular nuclear reactor technologies; fuel cell energy systems; and energy generation, where active capture and storage of carbon dioxide emissions associated with that energy generation is verified;
(d) "alternative fuel vehicle" means vehicles defined by section 301 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, as amended (42 U.S.C. 13211), and otherwise includes electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, dual fueled alternative fuel vehicles, qualified fuel cell motor vehicles, advanced lean burn technology motor vehicles, low greenhouse gas vehicles, compressed natural gas powered vehicles, self-propelled vehicles such as bicycles, and any other alternative fuel vehicles that are defined by statute;
(e) "clean energy" means renewable electric energy and alternative energy;
(f) "climate resilient design" means to design assets to prepare for, withstand, respond to, or quickly recover from disruptions due to severe weather events and climate change for the intended life of the asset;
(g) "construction and demolition materials and debris" means waste materials and debris generated during construction, renovation, demolition, or dismantling of all structures and buildings and associated infrastructure;
(h) "Contributing Agencies" are defined as executive agencies that are not subject to the Chief Financial Officers Act and include Federal Boards, Commissions, and Committees;
(i) "divert" or "diverting" means redirecting materials from disposal in landfills or incinerators to recycling or recovery, excluding diversion to waste-to-energy facilities;
(j) "environmentally preferable" means products or services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. This comparison may consider raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, use, operation, maintenance, or disposal related to the product or service;
(k) "excluded vehicles and equipment" means any vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or non-road equipment owned or operated by an agency of the Federal Government that is used in combat support, combat service support, tactical or relief operations, or training for such operations or spaceflight vehicles (including associated ground-support equipment);
(l) "Federal facility" means any building or collection of buildings, grounds, or structures, as well as any fixture or part thereof, which is owned by the United States or any Federal agency or that is held by the United States or any Federal agency under a lease-acquisition agreement under which the United States or a Federal agency will receive fee simple title under the terms of such agreement without further negotiation;
(m) "greenhouse gases" means carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, nitrogen triflouride, and sulfur hexafluoride;
(n) "life-cycle cost-effective" means the life-cycle costs of a product, project, or measure are estimated to be equal to or less than the base case (i.e., current or standard practice or product);
(o) "net-zero energy building" means a building that is designed, constructed, or renovated and operated such that the actual annual source energy consumption is balanced by on-site renewable energy;
(p) "net-zero water building" means a building that is designed, constructed, or renovated and operated to greatly reduce total water consumption, use non-potable sources as much as possible, and recycle and reuse water in order to return the equivalent amount of water as was withdrawn from all sources, including municipal supply, without compromising groundwater and surface water quantity or quality;
(q) "net-zero waste building" means a building that is operated to reduce, reuse, recycle, compost, or recover solid waste streams (with the exception of hazardous and medical waste) thereby resulting in zero waste disposal;
(r) "passenger vehicle" means a sedan or station wagon designed primarily to transport people as defined in 102-34.35 of the Federal Management Regulation;
(s) "power usage effectiveness" means the ratio obtained by dividing the total amount of electricity and other power consumed in running a data center by the power consumed by the information and communications technology in the data center;
(t) "Principal Agencies" mean agencies subject to the Chief Financial Officers Act and agencies subject to the OMB Scorecard process under section 5(b) of this order;
(u) "renewable energy certificate" means the technology and environmental (non-energy) attributes that represent proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource, that can be sold separately from the underlying generic electricity with which they are associated, and that, for the purposes of section 3(d)(iii) and (iv) of this order, were produced by sources of renewable energy placed into service within 10 years prior to the start of the fiscal year;
(v) "renewable electric energy" means energy produced by solar, wind, biomass, landfill gas, ocean (including tidal, wave, current, and thermal), geothermal, geothermal heat pumps, microturbines, municipal solid waste, or new hydroelectric generation capacity achieved from increased efficiency or additions of new capacity at an existing hydroelectric project;
(w) "resilience" means the ability to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to changing conditions and withstand, respond to, and recover rapidly from disruptions;
(x) "scope 1, 2, and 3" mean:
(i) scope 1: direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the agency;
(ii) scope 2: direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of electricity, heat, or steam purchased by an agency;
(iii) scope 3: greenhouse gas emissions from sources not owned or directly controlled by an agency but related to agency activities such as vendor supply chains, delivery and transportation services, and employee travel and commuting;
(y) "United States" means the fifty States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands, and associated territorial waters and airspace;
(z) "water balance" means a comparison of the water supplied to a defined system to the water consumed by that system in order to identify the proportion of water consumed for specific end-uses and ensure potential water leaks in the system are addressed; and
(aa) "zero emission vehicle" means a vehicle that produces zero exhaust emissions of any criteria pollutant (or precursor pollutant) or greenhouse gas under any possible operational modes or conditions.
Sec. 20. General Provisions
(a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii) the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(b) This order shall be implemented in a manner consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Read the EO at whitehouse.gov.


Annotations

  • zero emission vehicle

    A vehicle that produces zero exhaust emissions of any criteria pollutant (or precursor pollutant) or greenhouse gas under any possible operational modes or conditions.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Zero Emission Vehicle on SFTool
  • work-related travel

    Use video conferencing equipment to reduce the need for work related travel, thereby reducing your organizations carbon footprint.
    >> Explore Enclosed Conference Spaces for more tips on conferencing
  • within 90 days of the date of this order

    by June 17, 2015
  • within 45 days of the date of this order

    by May 3, 2015
  • within 30 days of the date of this order

    by April 18, 2015
  • within 180 days of the date of this order

    by September 15, 2015
  • within 150 days of the date of this order

    by August 16, 2015
  • WaterSense

    WaterSense, a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), seeks to help consumers make smart water choices that save money and maintain high environmental standards without compromising performance.  Independent, third-party licensed certifying bodies certify that products meet EPA criteria for water-efficiency and performance by following testing and certification protocols specific to each product category.  Products and services that have earned the WaterSense label have been certified to be at least 20% more efficient without sacrificing performance.

    >> View sample contract language for procuring WaterSense products and services

    >> Search the GPC for products and services requiring the WaterSense designation

    >> Learn more at EPA
  • water reuse

    Harvesting systems capture and reuse non-potable on-site water sources for building applications not requiring clean water such as landscape irrigation and fixture flushing.Best practice techniques include the harvesting of rainwater, greywater, condensate, stormwater and/or sump water.
    >> Explore the Water Building System for more water reuse guidance
  • water meters

    Water meters are sensors that measure and record water consumption. Sub-meter and monitor water use to detect and fix leaks in the system. Submetering captures more detailed consumption information, which helps to identify building inefficiencies, meet performance goals, and improve occupant awareness.
    >> Explore the Submetering Whole Building System for more information on metering
  • water management strategies

    • Sub-meter and monitor water use to detect and fix leaks in the system.
    • Commission water and sewer systems as part of the project quality assurance process.
    • Replace conventional fixtures with water-efficient plumbing fixtures
    • Adhere to all state and local ordinances with regards to water harvesting systems. Work together with legislators to find amiable alternatives.

    >> See the presentation about WaterSense Resources available to federal facility water managers, from WaterSense and beyond. Among the topics covered are flushometer-valve toilets, commercial and institutional water best management practices, and drought maps.

    >> Read FEMP's Water Efficiency Tools and Training Presentation

    Go to GSA's Indoor Water Conservation Tool for facts, strategies, and resources on indoor water management.

    Source: FEMP >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more high-performance guidance
  • water impacts

    Climate change will challenge the reliability of water supplies in some areas. Changes in precipitation patterns and reduced snowpack are some of the changes that will affect the quality and quantity of water available to Americans.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Water Resources >> Learn more about the impacts of climate change on water from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • water conservation

    Commercial buildings have significant opportunities to conserve the quantity of water needed for daily operations through thoughtful design of the building plumbing fixtures, landscape, boiler and cooling tower systems, and single-pass cooling equipment. Consider doing the following:

    • Replace standard plumbing fixtures with high efficiency fixtures.
    • Implement water efficient irrigation equipment such as drip or micro irrigation and advanced weather based controls for landscaping that needs supplemental water.
    • Sub-meter and monitor water use to detect and fix leaks in the system.
    >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more detailed strategies
  • water balance

    A comparison of the water supplied to a defined system to the water consumed by that system in order to identify the proportion of water consumed for specific end-uses and ensure potential water leaks in the system are addressed.
    Source: EO 13693
  • waste prevention

    Waste prevention, also known as source reduction, means reducing the volume or toxicity of waste generated. Source reduction occurs before materials have been identified as “waste”. For example, building management can designate reuse centers for office supplies and other reusable goods. Another example of source reduction is implementing a paper reduction campaign through double sided and electronic printing.

    >> Search source reduction on SFTool

    >> Learn more at EPA
  • USDA

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides leadership on food, agriculture, natural resources, rural development, nutrition, and related issues based on sound public policy, the best available science, and efficient management.
    Source: USDA - Mission Statement >> Learn more at USDA
  • United States

    The fifty States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands, and associated territorial waters and airspace.
    Source: EO 13693
  • transportation impacts

    Sea level rise, storm surge, and extreme weather events affect the reliability and capacity of U.S. transportation systems. Coastal infrastructure faces particular risks. Extreme weather events disrupt transportation networks.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Transportation >> Learn more about the impacts of climate change on transportation from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials

    Non-toxic implies that a product, substance, or chemical will not cause adverse health effects, either immediately or over the long-term.
    >> Search Non-toxic on SFTool
  • test-bed technologies

    The federal government has several test-bed programs for sustainable technologies, including GSA's Green Proving Ground, DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP)/Environmental Security Technology Certification Program(ESTCP), and DOE's High-Impact Technology Catalyst.

    >> Learn more at GPG

    >> GSA's GPG Program Overview Presentation

    >> Presentation on NREL's Technology Performance Exchange: An Overview and Update

    Source: GSA, NREL >> Learn more at SERDP/ESTCP
  • telecommuting

    A work flexibility arrangement under which an employee performs the duties and responsibilities of such employee's position, and other authorized activities, from an appropriate alternative worksite other than the location from which the employee would otherwise work.
    Source: GSA Telework Policy >> Learn more at GSA
  • Sustainable Practices for Designed Landscapes

    Describes strategies to achieve sustainable Federal landscape practices. The guidance is to be used by Federal agencies for landscape practices when constructing new, or rehabilitating existing, owned or leased facilities, or when landscaping improvements are otherwise planned.
    >> Read the full text at the White House
  • Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities

    These Instructions apply to all Federal agencies and activities that are subject to E.O. 13514. They are applicable to agencies acquiring or developing owned or leased space directly, either for their own or another Federal agency’s use, as well as agencies defining or requesting space needs that will be met by others.
    >> Read the full text at the White House
  • sustainability

    Sustainability is based on a simple principle: Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our natural environment. Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations. Sustainability is important to making sure that we have and will continue to have, the water, materials, and resources to protect human health and our environment.

    Source: EPA - Sustainability - Basic Information >> Explore on SFTool
  • supply chain

    Organizations' supply chains often account for more than 75 percent of their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, when taking into account their overall climate impacts.
    Source: EPA - Supply Chain >> Learn more at EPA
  • Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan

    Federal agencies are required to develop, implement and annually update a plan that prioritizes actions based on a positive return on investment for the American taxpayer and to meet GHG emissions, energy, water, and waste reduction targets.
    >> Learn more on SSPP's at White House CEQ
  • stormwater management

    • Pervious paving and landscaping allow water to be absorbed into the ground, percolating through natural filters and into aquifers. Impervious surfaces, such as sidewalks and roofs, force storm water to flow directly into the storm drain. This can lead to combined sewer overflow during times of significant rainfall. Additionally, excess storm water may collect contaminants prior to entering the storm drain, and depending on the location, may drain into natural waterways without being treated.
    >> Learn more about stormwater from the Environmental Protection Agency
  • State, local, and tribal communities

    The State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience (Task Force) was established by Executive Order 13653, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change, on November 1, 2013. The President charged the Task Force with providing recommendations on how the Federal Government can respond to the needs of communities nationwide that are dealing with the impacts of climate change by removing barriers to resilient investments, modernizing Federal grant and loan programs to better support local efforts, and developing the information and tools they need to prepare, among other measures.
    Source: Task Force - Recommendations to the President >> Read the full report from the Task Force
  • SNAP chemicals

    The Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program is EPA's program to evaluate and regulate substitutes for the ozone-depleting chemicals that are being phased out under the stratospheric ozone protection provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA).

    >> Search the GPC for products and services requring the SNAP designation

    >> Learn more at EPA
  • SmartWay

    EPA's SmartWay program helps the freight transportation sector improve supply chain efficiency. SmartWay reduces transportation-related emissions that affect climate change, reduce environmental risk for companies and increase global energy security.

    >> Search the GPC for products and services requring SmartWay designation

    >> Learn more at EPA
  • seven largest Federal procuring agencies

    The seven largest federal procuring agencies are:

    • Department of Defense (DOD)
    • Department of Energy (DOE)
    • Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
    • Department of Veteran's Affairs (VA)
    • United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
    • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
    • General Services Administration (GSA)
    Source: Agency Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans (SSPPs)
  • scope 3

    Greenhouse gas emissions from sources not owned or directly controlled by an agency but related to agency activities such as vendor supply chains, delivery and transportation services, and employee travel and commuting.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Scope 3 Greenhouse Gas Emissions on SFTool
  • scope 2

    Direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of electricity, heat, or steam purchased by an agency.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Scope 2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions on SFTool
  • scope 1

    Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the agency.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Scope 1 Greenhouse Gas Emissions on SFTool
  • Safer Choice

    EPA's voluntary Safer Choice program helps consumers, businesses, and purchasers find products that perform well and are safer for human health and the environment. The Safer Choice label means that every ingredient in the product has been reviewed by EPA scientists.

    >> Search the GPC for products designated under the Safer Choice program

    Source: EPA - Safer Choice >> Learn more at EPA
  • risk

    "Risk management is particularly useful in planning for climate change. The likelihood and timing of future climate changes cannot be precisely known. Further, the types and severity of impacts cannot be exactly defined. This does not mean that organizations should walk away from an impossible problem: it means they should take prudent steps to avoid or minimize risks associated with unwanted outcomes."
    Source: EPA, Climate Ready Estuaries: Climate Change Risk Management >> Learn more about the risks of climate change from the USGCRP
  • resilience

    The ability to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to changing conditions and withstand, respond to, and recover rapidly from disruptions.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Learn more about resilience from CEQ
  • renewable energy certificate

    The technology and environmental (non-energy) attributes that represent proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource, that can be sold separately from the underlying generic electricity with which they are associated, and that, for the purposes of section 3(d)(iii) and (iv) of this order, were produced by sources of renewable energy placed into service within 10 years prior to the start of the fiscal year.
    Source: EO 13693
  • renewable energy

    Renewable energy is a resource that is replaced rapidly by natural processes. Examples include energy from the sun, wind, small (low-impact) hydropower, geothermal energy, and wave and tidal systems.
    >> Search Renewable Energy on SFTool
  • renewable electric energy

    Energy produced by solar, wind, biomass, landfill gas, ocean (including tidal, wave, current, and thermal), geothermal, geothermal heat pumps, microturbines, municipal solid waste, or new hydroelectric generation capacity achieved from increased efficiency or additions of new capacity at an existing hydroelectric project.
    Source: EO 13693
  • reduce chemical use

    A successful Green Cleaning Plan limits the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemicals, ensures proper custodial effectiveness, and emphasizes the use of sustainable cleaning products and equipment.
    >> Explore the IEQ Building System for more IPM guidance
  • recycled content

    Products containing recycled content are made from materials that would otherwise be discarded. Recycled content material reduces the need for virgin materials. There are two types of recycled content: postconsumer and preconsumer (also called post-industrial).  Agencies are required to purchased recycled content products as designated by EPA under its Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (CPG) program.

    >> View sample contract language for requiring recycled content products
    >> Search GPC for designated products requiring recycled content

    >> Learn more at EPA
  • projected impacts

    Global climate is projected to continue to change – how much depends primarily on the amount of heat-trapping gases emitted globally.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Future Climate Change >> Learn more about the projected impacts of climate change from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • procurement

    • Create purchasing plans and programs that give preference to items containing recycled content, certified wood, and rapidly-renewable materials.
    • Select energy efficient, non-toxic, durable, and locally manufactured, harvested and / or extracted items.
    • Seek vendors who promote source reduction through reusable or minimal packaging of products.
    >> Explore the Green Procurement Compilation (GPC) to learn about federal green purchasing requirements
  • Principal Agencies

    Agencies subject to the Chief Financial Officers Act and agencies subject to the OMB Scorecard process under section 5(b) of this order.
    Source: EO 13693
  • Presidential Memorandum of November 10, 1961

    President John F. Kennedy's memorandum established the Federal Executive Boards (FEBs).
    Source: FEB >> Read the full text at FEB
  • Presidential Memorandum of May 24, 2011

    President Barack Obama's memorandum on Federal Fleet Performance
    >> Read the full text of the memorandum
  • Presidential Memorandum of February 21, 2012

    President Barack Obama's memorandum on Driving Innovation and Creating Jobs in Rural America through Biobased and Sustainable Product Procurement
    >> Read the full text of the memorandum
  • Presidential Memorandum of December 5, 2013

    President Barack Obama's memorandum on Federal Leadership on Energy Management
    >> Read the full text of the memorandum
  • Presidential Memorandum of December 2, 2011

    President Barack Obama's memorandum on the Implementation of Energy Savings Projects and Performance-Based Contracting for Energy Savings
    >> Read the full text of the memorandum
  • preparedness

    The actions taken to plan, organize, equip, train, and exercise to build, apply, and sustain the capabilities necessary to prevent, protect against, ameliorate the effects of, respond to, and recover from climate change related damages to life, health, property, livelihoods, ecosystems, and national security.
    Source: EO 13653
  • power usage effectiveness

    The ratio obtained by dividing the total amount of electricity and other power consumed in running a data center by the power consumed by the information and communications technology in the data center.
    Source: EO 13693
  • potable water

    Potable water is drinkable water. It flows from faucets and showerheads and is used in dishwashers, all of which require clean water for sanitary purposes. Potable water is also used to flush toilets and irrigate landscapes – both are functions that could easily use greywater (recycled water) without compromising efficiency.
    >> Search Potable Water on SFTool
  • postconsumer

    Postconsumer content is an end product that has completed its life cycle as a consumer item and rather than being sent to the landfill, it is diverted by reusing the material in a new product. Examples of items that may include postconsumer content are office paper, cardboard, aluminum cans, plastics and metals. By recycling materials that have served their intended use, new products can be made. For example, carpet backing can be made from recycled plastic bottles. It’s just as important to purchase materials that contain recycled content as it is to recycle.
    >> Search Post-Consumer on SFTool
  • Portfolio Manager

    EPA's ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager is an online tool to measure and track energy and water consumption, as well as greenhouse gas emissions. It can be used to benchmark the performance of one building or a whole portfolio of buildings.

    >> Read the EPA's Portfolio Manager Overview Presentation to the Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Source: ENERGY STAR - Use Portfolio Manager >> Learn more at ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager
  • pollution prevention

    Pollution prevention is reducing or eliminating waste at the source by modifying production processes, promoting the use of non-toxic or less-toxic substances, implementing conservation techniques, and re-using materials rather than putting them into the waste stream.
    Source: EPA - Pollution Prevention >> Learn more at EPA
  • performance contracting

    Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) allow Federal agencies to complete energy-savings projects without up-front capital costs and special Congressional appropriations. An ESPC is a partnership between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit of Federal facilities and identifies improvements to save energy. In consultation with the Federal agency, the ESCO designs and constructs a project that meets the agency's needs and arranges the necessary funding. The ESCO guarantees that the improvements will generate energy cost savings to pay for the project over the term of the contract (up to 25 years). After the contract ends, all additional cost savings accrue to the agency.
    >> Learn more at DOE
  • passenger vehicle

    A sedan or station wagon designed primarily to transport people as defined in 102-34.35 of the Federal Management Regulation.
    Source: EO 13693
  • OPM

    The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) works to recruit, retain and honor a world-class workforce for the American people.
    Source: OPM >> Learn more at OPM
  • operations and maintenance

    Ongoing facility management and operations drastically influence the facility's environmental impact. Explore whole building system O&M Green Tips and Strategies for best practices.
    >> Search Operation and Maintenance on SFTool for additional guidance
  • OMB Director

    The Deputy Director for Management leads the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).
    >> Learn more at White House OMB
  • OMB Circular A-119

    Revised OMB Circular A-119 establishes policies on Federal use and development of voluntary consensus standards and on conformity assessment activities.
    >> Read the full text of OMB Circular A-119
  • net-zero water building

    A building that is designed, constructed, or renovated and operated to greatly reduce total water consumption, use non-potable sources as much as possible, and recycle and reuse water in order to return the equivalent amount of water as was withdrawn from all sources, including municipal supply, without compromising groundwater and surface water quantity or quality.

    For examples of how the Army has implemented net-zero water projects in partnership with the EPA, see this EPA presentation.

    Source: EO 13693
  • net-zero waste building

    A building that is operated to reduce, reuse, recycle, compost, or recover solid waste streams (with the exception of hazardous and medical waste) thereby resulting in zero waste disposal.
    Source: EO 13693
  • net-zero energy building

    A building that is designed, constructed, or renovated and operated such that the actual annual source energy consumption is balanced by on-site renewable energy.

    >> DOE and NIBS Presentation on Defining Zero Energy Buildings

    >> New Buildings Institute's presentation on Net Zero Energy Building Examples and Statistics

    >> DOE Zero Energy Building Definition Presentation

    Source: EO 13693 >> Learn how to reach Net Zero Energy on SFTool
  • NDAA FY2010

    The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) authorizes the budget authority of the Department of Defense and the national security programs of the Department of Energy. Section 2842 amends the FY2007 NDAA to change DOD '"electric energy" renewable energy goals to "facility energy" renewable goals and removing reference to "activities". It also defines "renewable energy sources" to be:

    • Solar
    • Wind
    • Biomass
    • Landfill gas
    • Ocean (including tidal, wave, current, and thermal)
    • Geothermal (including electfcity and heat pumps)
    • Municipal solid waste
    • New hydroelectric generation capacity (increased efficiency or additions of new capacity at an existing hydroelectric project)
    • Thermal energy generated from any of these sources
    Source: NDAA FY2010 >> Read the full text of NDAA 2010
  • NDAA FY2007

    The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) authorizes the budget authority of the Department of Defense and the national security programs of the Department of Energy. Section 2852 sets a goal of having at least 25% of electric energy used by facilities and activities be renewable by 2025. It also states that DOD should produce or procure renewable energy whenever consistent with the energy performance goals or energy performance plan.

    Source: NDAA FY2007 >> Read the full text of NDAA 2007
  • National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995

    Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 directs all Federal agencies and departments to "use technical standards that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies".
    >> Read the full text of the Act
  • life-cycle cost-effective

    The life-cycle costs of a product, project, or measure are estimated to be equal to or less than the base case (i.e., current or standard practice or product).
    Source: EO 13693
  • inventory of major Federal suppliers

    The White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) will release a "Federal Supplier Greenhouse Gas Management Scorecard" yearly with two scores for each companY: emissions disclosures and emissions reduction targets.
    >> View the full scorecard at the White House
  • infrastructure

    Many communities depend on infrastructure, like water and sewage systems, roads, bridges, and power plants, that is aging and in need of repair or replacement. Rising sea levels, storm surges, heat waves, and extreme weather events will compound those issues, stressing or even overwhelming these essential services.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Infrastructure >> Learn more about infrastructure vulnerabilities from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • impacts

    Global climate is changing and this change is apparent across a wide range of observations.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Climate Trends >> Learn more about the impacts of climate change from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • ILA water consumption

    • Xeriscaping can eliminate irrigation needs altogether and should be the goal of any water project.
    • On-site water treatment can be designed for visual appeal, such as a pond among attractive native plantings.
    >> Explore the Water Building System for more landscaping guidance
  • health

    Climate change threatens human health and well-being in many ways, including impacts from increased extreme weather events, wildfire, decreased air quality, and illnesses transmitted by food, water, and diseases carriers such as mosquitoes and ticks.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Human Health >> Learn more from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • Guiding Principles

    The Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings (now referred to as the Guiding Principles for Sustainable Federal Buildings) are a set of sustainable principles for integrated design, energy performance, water conservation, indoor environmental quality, materials, and climate change adaptation aimed at helping Federal agencies and organizations:
    • Reduce the total ownership cost of facilities
    • Improve energy efficiency and water conservation
    • Provide safe, healthy, and productive built environments
    • Promote sustainable environmental stewardship

    Learn more at the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ)

    See also FEMP's Guiding Principles site.

    >> Learn more at the Whole Building Design Guide
  • GSA Regional Offices

    GSA has 11 regional offices
    >> Learn more at GSA
  • greenhouse gases

    Carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, nitrogen triflouride, and sulfur hexafluoride
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Greenhouse Gases on SFTool
  • Green Button

    The Green Button initiative is an industry-led effort that responds to a White House call-to-action to provide utility customers with easy and secure access to their energy usage information in a consumer-friendly and computer-friendly format. Customers are able to securely download their own detailed energy usage with a simple click of a literal "Green Button" on electric utilities' websites.
    Source: DOE - Green Button >> Learn more at Green Button
  • fuel cell energy systems

    Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.
    Source: DOE - Hydrogen & Fuel Cells >> Learn more at DOE
  • food and compostable material

    Food waste and related organic material can be converted into a nutrient-rich soil amendment through composting. Composting is the controlled biological decomposition of organic materials, such as leaves, grass clippings, and food waste, into a nutrient-rich organic matter that improves soils for plant growth.

    • To strive for zero waste to the landfill, consider placing separate food waste collection bins in the kitchen/pantry rooms where food waste is centrally generated.
    • Consider purchasing bio-based compostable products that the local composting company will accept.
    >> Explore the Solid Waste Whole Building System on SFTool
  • FleetDASH

    The Fleet Sustainability Dashboard, or FleetDASH, tracks participating Federal agencies’ fleet fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and vehicle inventories throughout the year. Consumption is broken out by alternative fuels and petroleum fuels and summarized both for the current fiscal year to date (beginning October 1st) and on a monthly basis. The tool allows users to view national summaries or drill down through organizational levels to ultimately view individual vehicle fuel use and fuel transactions.
    Source: FleetDASH >> Learn more at FleetDASH
  • Federal Procurement Data System

    Government agencies are responsible for collecting and reporting data on federal procurements through the Federal Procurement Data System–Next Generation (FPDS-NG).

    The federal government uses the reported data to measure and assess the impact of federal procurement on the nation’s economy, learn how awards are made to businesses in various socioeconomic categories, understand the impact of full and open competition on the acquisition process, and address changes to procurement policy.

    Contracting Officers (COs) must submit complete reports on all contract actions, as required by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR).

    Source: GSA - Federal Procurement Data System >> Learn more at the FPDS
  • Federal Motor Vehicle Registration System

    The Federal Motor Vehicle Registration System (FMVRS) provides access to information for all vehicles that are owned or commercially-leased by the Federal Government.
    Source: GSA - FMVRS >> Learn more at FMVRS
  • Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance

    Establishes requirements for Federal agencies in calculating and reporting GHG emissions associated with agency operations. The Guidance is accompanied by a separate Technical Support Document for Federal GHG Accounting and Reporting (TSD), which provides detailed information on inventory reporting requirements and calculation methodologies. Federal agencies are required to use the Guidance when reporting GHG emissions under E.O. 13514.
    >> Read the full text at the White House
  • Federal fleet

    The Federal Government operates a fleet of more than 600,000 civilian and non-tactical military vehicles, consuming more than 380 million gasoline gallon equivalents (GGE) of gasoline and diesel fuel each year. Although the Federal fleet has increased its use of alternative fuels, these fuels still comprise less than three percent of total Federal fleet fuel consumption.

    >> Learn more about sustainable federal fleets at DOE

    >> Learn about the federal fleet at EPA
  • Federal facility

    Any building or collection of buildings, grounds, or structures, as well as any fixture or part thereof, which is owned by the United States or any Federal agency or that is held by the United States or any Federal agency under a lease-acquisition agreement under which the United States or a Federal agency will receive fee simple title under the terms of such agreement without further negotiation.
    Source: EO 13693
  • Federal Executive Boards

    The Federal Executive Boards (FEBs) are a forum for communication and collaboration among Federal agencies outside of Washington, DC. Approximately 85 percent of all Federal employees work outside the National Capital Region. The National network of 28 FEBs, located in areas of significant Federal populations, serves as the cornerstone for strategic partnering in Government.
    Source: FEB >> Learn more at Federal Executive Boards
  • Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) designated

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sets minimum energy efficiency requirements for product categories that have the potential to generate significant Federal energy savings.

    >> View sample contract language for procuring FEMP-designated products

    >> Search the GPC for products and services requring FEMP designation

    The DOE Federal Energy Management Program describes two FEMP Tech Deployment Tools in this presentation: the Technologies and Products Database and the Technology Deployment Case Studies map.

    >> Learn more at FEMP
  • Federal educational programs

    The Federal government has a wide variety of educational programs such as:

    In its FEDSAT presentation, GSA's Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings explores tools and resources that can help federal buildings professionals comply with the Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act. The Federal Facilities Skills Assessment Tool (FEDSAT) helps identify and fill basic knowledge and skills gaps; Accelerate FM guides long-term professional development. For more information, visit the Facilities Management Institute.

  • Federal Automotive Statistical Tool

    The FAST (Federal Automotive Statistical Tool) system (or just "FAST") was developed to assist fleets in meeting the data reporting requirements of Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental,Energy, and Economic Performance," Executive Order 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental,Energy, and Transportation Management," the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the General Services Administration's SF82 "Agency Report of Motor Vehicle Data", and the Office of Management and Budget's Circular A-11 "Preparation, Submission and Execution of the Budget". Data collected through FAST will satisfy all of these requirements.
    Source: GSA - FAST >> Go to FAST
  • Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions

    Provides instructions to Federal agencies on implementation of the water use efficiency and management goals of section 2(d) of Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance (74 Fed. Reg. 52117).
    >> Read the full text at the White House
  • Executive Schedule

    >> View OPM Pay Tables
  • EO 13514

    The goal of EO 13514 is "to establish an integrated strategy towards sustainability in the Federal Government and to make reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) a priority for Federal agencies". EO 13514 was superceeded by EO 13693.
    Source: EO 13514 >> Read hot annotations for EO 13514
  • excluded vehicles and equipment

    Any vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or non-road equipment owned or operated by an agency of the Federal Government that is used in combat support, combat service support, tactical or relief operations, or training for such operations or spaceflight vehicles (including associated ground-support equipment).
    Source: EO 13693 Search Excluded Vehicles and Equipment on SFTool
  • EPA Regional Offices

    EPA has ten regional offices across the country, each of which is responsible for several states and in some cases, territories or special environmental programs.
    Source: EPA - Visiting a Regional Office >> Learn more at EPA
  • EPA

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protects human health and the environment through regulations, grants, research, partnerships, and education.
    Source: EPA - About >> Learn more at EPA
  • EO 13653

    Executive Order 13653: Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change
    >> Explore the annotated EO 13653 on SFTool
  • environmentally preferable

    Products or services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. This comparison may consider raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, use, operation, maintenance, or disposal related to the product or service
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Environmentally Preferable Products and Services on SFTool
  • Environmental Management Systems (EMS)

    An Environmental Management System (EMS) is a set of processes and practices that enable an organization to reduce its environmental impacts and increase its operating efficiency. This Web site provides information and resources related to EMS for businesses, associations, the public, and state and federal agencies.
    Source: EPA - EMS >> Learn more at EPA
  • ENERGY STAR qualified

    ENERGY STAR is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. ENERGY STAR helps save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices.

    >> View sample contract language for procuring ENERGY STAR products

    >> Search the GPC for products requiring the ENERGY STAR designation

    >> Learn more at ENERGY STAR
  • energy meters

    Conventional metering (or master-metering) typically provides utility readings for an entire building or facility once per month. In contrast, submetering offers a powerful insight into a building's resource use by capturing more detailed consumption information, which helps to identify building inefficiencies, meet performance goals, and improve occupant awareness.
    >> Explore the Submetering Whole Building System for more information on energy meters
  • energy intensity

    Energy intensity is the normalized energy use per unit, often the energy use per square foot. Efficient systems, operating practices, and space layout contribute to reduced energy intensity. It is important to understand how building systems and their components interact with one another in order to optimize facility energy-efficiency.
    >> Explore Whole Building Systems for more guidance on reducing energy intensity
  • energy impacts

    Extreme weather events cause energy supply disruptions. Net electricity use is projected to rise as the increase in summer cooling needs outpaces the decrease in winter heating needs. Coastal energy facilities face growing risks.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, Energy Supply and Use >> Learn more about the impacts of climate change on energy from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • energy efficiency

    Every year, much of the energy the U.S. consumes is wasted through transmission, heat loss and inefficient technology -- costing American families and businesses money, and leading to increased carbon pollution.
    Energy efficiency is one of the easiest and most cost effective ways to combat climate change, clean the air we breathe, improve the competitiveness of our businesses and reduce energy costs for consumers.
    Source: DOE - Energy Efficiency >> Search efficiency on SFTool
  • energy and water security

    The ability of U.S.households and businesses to accommodate disruptionsof supply in energy and water markets.

    >> Learn more about water security at EPA

    >> Learn more about energy security at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Source: Congressional Budget Office (CBO) - Energy Security in the United States >> Learn more about energy security at the White House
  • enable power management

    • Reduce plug loads by implementing occupancy sensors and automatic shut-off switches
    • Default all copiers and printers to two-sided, quick-draft printer settings
    • Procure energy-saving certified electronic devices
    >> Explore office support and other areas for power management guidance
  • Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986

    The objective of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) is to: (1) allow state and local planning for chemical emergencies, (2) provide for notification of emergency releases of chemicals, and (3) address communities' right-to-know about toxic and hazardous chemicals.
    Source: EPA - Agriculture >> Learn more at EPA
  • eletronics stewardship

    E-waste is the largest growing waste stream in the country. According to the most recent Environmental Protection Agency estimates, more than five million tons of electronics were in storage. Of those, 2.37 million tons were ready for end-of-life management, yet only twenty-five percent were collected for recycling.
    Source: GSA - Electronics Stewardship >> Learn more at GSA
  • electric power

    Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar.
    Source: DOE, Science & Innovation, Electric Power >> Learn more at DOE
  • efficient Federal operations

    Also see this presentation on results and best practices of Federal commissioning efforts.
    >> Explore efficient Federal operation case studies on SFTool
  • drought

    A period of abnormally dry weather marked by little or no rain that lasts long enough to cause water shortage for people and natural systems.
    Source: EPA - Create a New Climate for Action >> Learn more about severe droughts at the US Drought Portal
  • DOD

    The Department of Defense (DOD) is not only in charge of the military, but it also employs a civilian force of thousands. The Defense Department manages an inventory of installations and facilities to keep Americans safe. The Department’s physical plant is huge by any standard, consisting of more than several hundred thousand individual buildings and structures located at more than 5,000 different locations or sites. When all sites are added together, the Department of Defense utilizes over 30 million acres of land.
    Source: DOD - About >> Learn more at DOD
  • divert

    Redirect materials from disposal in landfills or incinerators to recycling or recovery, excluding diversion to waste-to-energy facilities
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Divert on SFTool
  • Director of National Intelligence

    The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) serves as the head of the Intelligence Community(IC), overseeing and directing the implementation of the National Intelligence Program (budget) and acting as the principal advisor to the President, the National Security Council, and the Homeland Security Council for intelligence matters related to the national security. Working together with the Principal Deputy DNI (PDDNI), the Office of the DNI's goal is to effectively integrate foreign, military and domestic intelligence in defense of the homeland and of United States interests abroad.
    Source: ODNI FAQ >> Learn more at DNI
  • direct emissions

    Direct emissions are equivalent to scope 1 emissions. These are the emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the agency, such as emissions from fossil fuels burned on site or from agency-owned or agency-leased vehicles.
    >> Learn more at EPA
  • Contributing Agencies

    Executive agencies that are not subject to the Chief Financial Officers Act and include Federal Boards, Commissions, and Committees
    Source: EO 13693
  • construction and demolition materials and debris

    Waste materials and debris generated during construction, renovation, demolition, or dismantling of all structures and buildings and associated infrastructure
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Construction and Demolition Waste on SFTool
  • combined heat and power

    Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat from a single fuel source, such as: natural gas, biomass, biogas, coal, waste heat, or oil.
    Source: EPA - Combined Heat and Power Partnership - Basic Information >> Learn more at EPA
  • climate resilient design

    To design assets to prepare for, withstand, respond to, or quickly recover from disruptions due to severe weather events and climate change for the intended life of the asset.
    Source: EO 13693
  • climate change

    Climate change refers to the changes in average weather conditions that persist for an extended period of time, over multiple decades or even longer. Year-to-year and even decade-to-decade conditions do not necessarily tell us much about long-term changes in climate. One cold year, or even a few cold years in a row, does not contradict a longterm warming trend, even as one hot year does not prove it.
    Source: USGCRP, Third NCA, FAQs >> Learn more from the Third National Climate Assessment
  • clean energy economy

    Moving toward a clean energy economy will improve the air we breathe and the water we drink and enhance our energy security by reducing dependence on oil. Clean energy will play a crucial role in slowing global climate change and cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

    >> Learn more at DOE

    >> Learn more at the White House
  • clean energy

    Renewable energy and alternative energy
    Source: EO 13693 >> Explore sources of clean energy at DOE
  • Chair of CEQ

    The Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) serves as the principal environmental policy adviser to the President.
    Source: CEQ: About - The President's Advisor >> Learn more at White House CEQ
  • CEQ

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) coordinates Federal environmental efforts and works closely with agencies and other White House offices in the development of environmental policies and initiatives.
    Source: CEQ - About >> Learn more at CEQ
  • capture and storage of carbon dioxide emissions

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage, or sequestration, (CCS) is a set of technologies that can greatly reduce CO2 emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants and large industrial sources. CCS is a three-step process that includes:
    • Capture of CO2 from power plants or industrial processes
    • Transport of the captured and compressed CO2 (usually in pipelines)
    • Underground injection and geologic sequestration (also referred to as storage) of the CO2 into deep underground rock formations. These formations are often a mile or more beneath the surface and consist of porous rock that holds the CO2. Overlying these formations are impermeable, non-porous layers of rock that trap the CO2 and prevent it from migrating upward.
    Source: EPA - Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration >> Learn more at EPA
  • BioPreferred

    BioPreferred includes both a preferential procurement program for Federal agencies and their contractors and a voluntary labeling program for the broad scale consumer. Under the Federal procurement preference program, USDA designates categories of biobased products (e.g., glass cleaners). Federal agencies and their contractors are then required to give preferential consideration to biobased products in the designated BioPreferred product categories when making purchases. As a part of the designation process, USDA establishes the minimum biobased content for the category. The technical, health, and environmental characteristics of these products are also considered.

    >> View sample contract language for procuring BioPreferred products

    >> Search the GPC for products designated under the BioPreferred federal program

    >> Learn more at BioPreferred
  • biobased

    A product or material derived from biological or renewable resources.  The USDA BioPreferred program designates product categories for which agencies and their contractors have mandatory purchasing requirements.

    >> View sample contract language for procuring BioPreferred products

    >> Search the GPC for products designated under the BioPreferred federal program

    >> Learn more at the Whole Building Design Guide
  • alternative fuel vehicle

    Vehicles defined by section 301 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, as amended (42 U.S.C. 13211), and otherwise includes electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, dual fueled alternative fuel vehicles, qualified fuel cell motor vehicles, advanced lean burn technology motor vehicles, low greenhouse gas vehicles, compressed natural gas powered vehicles, self-propelled vehicles such as bicycles, and any other alternative fuel vehicles that are defined by statute.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search Alternative Fuel Vehicle on SFTool
  • alternative energy

    Energy generated from technologies and approaches that advance renewable heat sources, including biomass, solar thermal, geothermal, waste heat, and renewable combined heat and power processes; combined heat and power; small modular nuclear reactor technologies; fuel cell energy systems; and energy generation, where active capture and storage of carbon dioxide emissions associated with that energy generation is verified.
    Source: EO 13693
  • agency

    An executive agency as defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code, excluding the Government Accountability Office.
    Source: EO 13693
  • absolute greenhouse gas emissions

    The total greenhouse gas emissions without normalization for activity levels and includes any allowable consideration of sequestration.
    Source: EO 13693 >> Search absolute greenhouse gas emissions on SFTool
  • sustainable acquisition

    Sustainable acquisition means acquiring goods and services in order to create and maintain conditions –

    1. 1. Under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony; and
    2. 2. That permits fulfilling the social, economic, and other requirements of present and future generations.
    Source: OMB - Office of Federal Procurement Policy >> Learn more at OMB
  • EO 13693 implementing instructions

    >> Read the implementing instructions issed by CEQ
  • remote building auditing technology

    Remote building energy performance assessment auditing technology, or remote building auditing technology, is analytics software that leverages existing advanced metering infrastructure and building energy monitoring and control equipment to provide real-time data visualizations of a building's energy use and operations.

    >> See the presentation about GSA's Advanced Metering Efforts

    >> See the presentation about 432 Compliant Facility Audits

    Source: CEQ, Implementing Instructions for EO 13693, FEMP >> See CEQ's Implementing Instructions for EO 13693 for additional guidance
  • demand management programs

    Demand management programs, also known as demand-side management (DSM), are programs where electric utilities engage with customers to reduce or shift electricity consumption during peak-demand hours of the day (i.e., business hours).
    Source: CEQ, Implementing Instructions for EO 13693 >> See CEQ's Implementing Instructions for EO 13693 for additional guidance
  • emissions

    This presentation from the DOE Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) details progress and prospects for reducing federal GHG emissions, and points out the FEMP website where agencies can find their GHG emissions data.
    Source: ISWG Inventory of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reductions to Date, and Potential Reductions
  • space utilization and optimization practices and policies

    The presentation below highlights GSA's office makeover and how it reduces energy, space, and rent while increasing workplace collaboration.
    Source: GSA The GSA Total Workplace Program
  • data center

    This presentation presents an overview of DOE's Better Buildings Challenge to increase energy efficiency of data centers. Learn more at the Data Center Challenge Website.
    Source: DOE Presentation: A National Initiative Driving Greater Energy Efficiency in US Data Center Partners
  • install agency-funded

    FEMP's Technical Assistance Request Portal is a resource providing agencies with renewable energy project technical assistance such as sample timelines, SOW development, fleet management, financing services and a catalog of renewable energy technologies. Learn more at FEMP's Technical Assistance Portal.

    >> Read an overview of FEMP's Renewable Energy Technical Assistance Program, which helps agencies with many steps of an on-site renewable energy project.

    Source: FEMP See the presentation on the FEMP Technical Assistance Portal
  • purchasing

    EPA's Green Power Partnership and Center for Corporate Climate Leadership describes how these two voluntary programs are helping increase renewable energy use. Includes information on Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and the EPA-sponsored Climate Leadership Awards. To learn more, visit the EPA websites for the Green Power Partnership and the Center for Corporate Climate Leadership.
    Source: EPA Presentation: U.S. EPA Activities to Support Green Power Purchasing
  • building energy conservation

    An overview of DOE's Better Buildings Program with agency resources such as procurement specifications, rooftop unit retrofits, and green leases. Learn more about the Advanced RTU Campaign or at the Green Lease Leader Program.
    Source: DOE Better Buildings: Cross-Sector Energy-Efficiency Opportunities
  • net-zero

    The presentation is an overview of the Army's net zero pilot program and installations. Visit Army Net Zero to learn more.
    Army Net Zero - Progress and Barriers to Becoming Net Zero
  • existing buildings

    Read the presentation, which looks at deep energy retrofits achieving at least 50% energy savings
    Rocky Mountain Institute: Scaling Deep Energy Retrofits
  • green leasing

    This presentation highlights the successful 'greening' of an office building by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Greening a Leased Office.

    >> Read a presentation on GSA's leased inventory, priorities, and green lease efforts.

  • Green Standards and Ecolabels

    The presentation is an overview of EPA's environmentally preferable purchasing program and timeline for developing EPP standards and ecolabels. Learn more at EPA's Green Purchasing Guide or see EPA's guidance on Environmentally Preferably Purchasing.
    Source: EPA Guidelines for Green Standards and Ecolabels
  • performance contracts

    Read a presentation introducing FEMP's new funding program: Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE. The presentation explains the streamlined process, timeline, energy conservation measures covered, and latest updates on project awards and the project pipeline.

    In this presentation, the Rocky Mountain Institute and GSA detail the National Deep Energy Retrofit program, best practices, keys to success, and case studies. To learn more, visit the RMI webpage, "General Services Administration Pursues Deep Energy Retrofits."

  • DOE training

    An introduction to FEMP's online, open-access courses for federal energy and facilities managers, state and local officials, and utility and private sector employees. Courses qualify for CEUs, AIA and USGBC credit. Learn more by searching FEMP's training programs or watch a video about IACET/FEMP CEUs.
    Presentation: Federal Energy Management Program Training
  • agency-wide carbon accounting

    GSA's Carbon Footprint Tool is a web-based tool designed for Federal agencies to collect, review, report, and reduce GHG emissions as required by EO13693. Learn more by clicking the presentation below.
    Source: GSA GSA Carbon Footprint Tool Overview

Hot Annotations

Hot annotations will appear here as you explore the document. Annotations contain valuable information about successfully putting policy into action.

  • Resources & Strategies
  • Definitions
  • Best Practices & Case Studies