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Executive Order 13514:
Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance (Archived)

Instructions

Executive Order (EO) 13514 was replaced by EO 13693. This page has been archived and is no longer maintained. The information below is available for reference only.

View resources on EO 13514 from the White House Council on Environmental Quality.The Sustainable Facilities Tool can also help you with Section 2 of EO 13514. Click through Section 2 below for definitions, strategies, and links. You can find the full text of the EO here: download EO 13514.

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Executive Order

Sec. 2. Goals for Agencies. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, and preparing and implementing the Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan called for in section 8 of this order, the head of each agency shall:

  • (a) within 90 days of the date of this order, establish and report to the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ Chair) and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB Director) a percentage reduction target for agency-wide reductions of scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions in absolute terms by fiscal year 2020, relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline of the agency’s scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions. Where appropriate, the target shall exclude direct emissions from excluded vehicles and equipment and from electric power produced and sold commercially to other parties in the course of regular business. This target shall be subject to review and approval by the CEQ Chair in consultation with the OMB Director under section 5 of this order. In establishing the target, the agency head shall consider reductions associated with:
    • (i) reducing energy intensity in agency buildings;
    • (ii) increasing agency use of renewable energy and implementing renewable energy generation projects on agency property; and
    • (iii) reducing the use of fossil fuels by:
      • (A) using low greenhouse gas emitting vehicles including alternative fuel vehicles;
      • (B) optimizing the number of vehicles in the agency fleet; and
      • (C) reducing, if the agency operates a fleet of at least 20 motor vehicles, the agency fleet’s total consumption of petroleum products by a minimum of 2 percent annually through the end of fiscal year 2020, relative to a baseline of fiscal year 2005;
  • (b) within 240 days of the date of this order and concurrent with submission of the Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan as described in section 8 of this order, establish and report to the CEQ Chair and the OMB Director a percentage reduction target for reducing agency-wide scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions in absolute terms by fiscal year 2020, relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline of agency scope 3 emissions. This target shall be subject to review and approval by the CEQ Chair in consultation with the OMB Director under section 5 of this order. In establishing the target, the agency head shall consider reductions associated with:
    • (i) pursuing opportunities with vendors and contractors to address and incorporate incentives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (such as changes to manufacturing, utility or delivery services, modes of transportation used, or other changes in supply chain activities);
    • (ii) implementing strategies and accommodations for transit, travel, training, and conferencing that actively support lower-carbon commuting and travel by agency staff;
    • (iii) greenhouse gas emission reductions associated with pursuing other relevant goals in this section; and
    • (iv) developing and implementing innovative policies and practices to address scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions unique to agency operations;
  • (c) establish and report to the CEQ Chair and OMB Director a comprehensive inventory of absolute greenhouse gas emissions, including scope 1, scope 2, and specified scope 3 emissions (i) within 15 months of the date of this order for fiscal year 2010, and (ii) thereafter, annually at the end of January, for the preceding fiscal year.
  • (d) improve water use efficiency and management by:
  • (e) promote pollution prevention and eliminate waste by:
    • (i) minimizing the generation of waste and pollutants through source reduction;
    • (ii) diverting at least 50 percent of non-hazardous solid waste, excluding construction and demolition debris, by the end of fiscal year 2015;
    • (iii) diverting at least 50 percent of construction and demolition materials and debris by the end of fiscal year 2015;
    • (iv) reducing printing paper use and acquiring uncoated printing and writing paper containing at least 30 percent postconsumer fiber
    • (v) reducing and minimizing the quantity of toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials acquired, used, or disposed of;
    • (vi) increasing diversion of compostable and organic material from the waste stream;
    • (vii) implementing integrated pest management and other appropriate landscape management practices;
    • (viii) increasing agency use of acceptable alternative chemicals and processes in keeping with the agency’s procurement policies;
    • (ix) decreasing agency use of chemicals where such decrease will assist the agency in achieving greenhouse gas emission reduction targets under section 2(a) and (b) of this order; and
    • (x) reporting in accordance with the requirements of sections 301 through 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act of 1986 (42 U.S.C. 11001 et seq.);
  • (f) advance regional and local integrated planning by:
    • (i) participating in regional transportation planning and recognizing existing community transportation infrastructure;
    • (ii) aligning Federal policies to increase the effectiveness of local planning for energy choices such as locally generated renewable energy;
    • (iii) ensuring that planning for new Federal facilities or new leases includes consideration of sites that are pedestrian friendly, near existing employment centers, and accessible to public transit, and emphasizes existing central cities and, in rural communities, existing or planned town centers;
    • (iv) identifying and analyzing impacts from energy usage and alternative energy sources in all Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments for proposals for new or expanded Federal facilities under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); and
    • (v) coordinating with regional programs for Federal, State, tribal, and local ecosystem, watershed, and environmental management;
  • (g) implement high performance sustainable Federal building design, construction, operation and management, maintenance, and deconstruction including by:
    • (i) beginning in 2020 and thereafter, ensuring that all new Federal buildings that enter the planning process are designed to achieve zero-net-energy by 2030;
    • (ii) ensuring that all new construction, major renovation, or repair and alteration of Federal buildings complies with the Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings, (Guiding Principles);
    • (iii) ensuring that at least 15 percent of the agency’s existing buildings (above 5,000 gross square feet) and building leases (above 5,000 gross square feet) meet the Guiding Principles by fiscal year 2015 and that the agency makes annual progress toward 100-percent conformance with the Guiding Principles for its building inventory;
    • (iv) pursuing cost-effective, innovative strategies, such as highly reflective and vegetated roofs, to minimize consumption of energy, water, and materials;
    • (v) managing existing building systems to reduce the consumption of energy, water, and materials, and identifying alternatives to renovation that reduce existing assets’ deferred maintenance costs;
    • (vi) when adding assets to the agency’s real property inventory, identifying opportunities to consolidate and dispose of existing assets, optimize the performance of the agency’s real-property portfolio, and reduce associated environmental impacts; and
    • (vii) ensuring that rehabilitation of federally owned historic buildings utilizes best practices and technologies in retrofitting to promote longterm viability of the buildings;
  • (h) advance sustainable acquisition to ensure that 95 percent of new contract actions including task and delivery orders, for products and services with the exception of acquisition of weapon systems, are energy-efficient (Energy Star or Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) designated), water-efficient, biobased, environmentally preferable (e.g., Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified), non-ozone depleting, contain recycled content, or are non-toxic or lesstoxic alternatives, where such products and services meet agency performance requirements;
  • (i) promote electronics stewardship, in particular by:
    • (i) ensuring procurement preference for EPEAT-registered electronic products;
    • (ii) establishing and implementing policies to enable power management, duplex printing, and other energy-efficient or environmentally preferable features on all eligible agency electronic products;
    • (iii) employing environmentally sound practices with respect to the agency’s disposition of all agency excess or surplus electronic products;
    • (iv) ensuring the procurement of Energy Star and FEMP designated electronic equipment;
    • (v) implementing best management practices for energy-efficient management of servers and Federal data centers; and
  • (j) sustain environmental management, including by:
    • (i) continuing implementation of formal environmental management systems at all appropriate organizational levels; and
    • (ii) ensuring these formal systems are appropriately implemented and maintained to achieve the performance necessary to meet the goals of this order.

Annotations

  • Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan

    Federal agencies are required to develop, implement and annually update a plan that prioritizes actions based on a positive return on investment for the American taxpayer and to meet GHG emissions, energy, water, and waste reduction targets.
    >> Learn more at White House CEQ
  • CEQ Chair

    The Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) serves as the principal environmental policy adviser to the President.
    >> Learn more at White House CEQ
  • OMB Director

    The Deputy Director for Management leads the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).
    >> Learn more at White House OMB
  • scope 1

    Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the Federal Agency. Examples include natural gas and fuel oil burned on site.
    >> Search Scope 1 GHG Emissions on SFTool
  • greenhouse gas emissions

    A range of human activities cause the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g., the release of carbon dioxide during fuel combustion). These gasses can damage or be trapped in the earth’s atmospheric layers, contributing to global climate change.
    >> Search Greenhouse Gas Emissions on SFTool
  • energy intensity in agency buildings

    • Energy intensity is the normalized energy use per unit, often the energy use per square foot. Efficient systems, operating practices, and space layout contribute to reduced energy intensity. It is important to understand how building systems and their components interact with one another in order to optimize facility energy-efficiency.

    >> Explore Whole Building Lighting >> Explore Whole Building HVAC

    >> Explore Whole Building Systems for more guidance on reducing energy intensity
  • renewable energy

    Renewable energy is a resource that is replaced rapidly by natural processes. Examples include energy from the sun, wind, small (low-impact) hydropower, geothermal energy, and wave and tidal systems.
    >> Search Renewable Energy on SFTool
  • fossil fuels

    A hydrocarbon deposit, such as petroleum, coal, or natural gas, derived from living matter of a previous geologic time and used for fuel. The supply of these fuels is not renewable on a reasonable timeline. The burning of fossil fuels for energy also contributes to pollution and releases greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere.
    >> Search Fossil Fuel on SFTool
  • alternative fuel vehicles

    Vehicles defined by section 301 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, as amended, including electric fueled vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, etc.
    >> Learn More on Alternative Fuel Vehicles on SFTool
  • Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan

    Federal agencies are required to develop, implement and annually update a plan that prioritizes actions based on a positive return on investment for the American taxpayer and to meet GHG emissions, energy, water, and waste reduction targets.
    >> Learn more on SSPP's at White House CEQ
  • strategies and accommodations for transit, travel, training, and conferencing

    • Use video conferencing equipment to reduce the need for work related travel, thereby reducing your organizations carbon footprint.
    >> Explore Enclosed Conference Spaces for more tips on conferencing
  • absolute greenhouse gas emissions

    Total greenhouse gas emissions without normalization for activity levels
    >> Search Absolute GHG Emissions on SFTool
  • potable water

    Potable water is drinkable water.  It flows from faucets and showerheads and is used in dishwashers, all of which require clean water for sanitary purposes.  Potable water is also used to flush toilets and irrigate landscapes – both are functions that could easily use greywater (recycled water) without compromising efficiency.
    >> Search Potable Water on SFTool
  • water management strategies

    • Sub-meter and monitor water use to detect and fix leaks in the system.
    • Commission water and sewer systems as part of the project quality assurance process.
    • Replace conventional fixtures with water-efficient plumbing fixtures
    • Adhere to all state and local ordinances with regards to water harvesting systems. Work together with legislators to find amiable alternatives.
    >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more high-performance guidance
  • low-flow

    Low-flow plumbing fixtures use less water than their conventional counterparts to fulfill their purposes. The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) sets the maximum allowable water usage per fixture type, however many water-saving technologies are available today to reduce consumption and utility bills even further.
    >> Search Low-Flow on SFTool
  • cooling towers

    Water leaves the cooling tower system through evaporation, blow-down, basin leaks, and overflows, and therefore has to be replaced. Efficiency measures, like conductivity sensors, can be employed to significantly reduce these losses.
    >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more cooling tower guidance
  • industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water consumption

    • Xeriscaping can eliminate irrigation needs altogether and should be the goal of any water project.
    • On-site water treatment can be designed for visual appeal, such as a pond among attractive native plantings.
    >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more landscaping guidance
  • water reuse

    • Harvesting systems capture and reuse non-potable on-site water sources for building applications not requiring clean water such as landscape irrigation and fixture flushing.
    • Best practice techniques include the harvesting of rainwater, greywater, condensate, stormwater and/or sump water.
    >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more water reuse guidance
  • stormwater

    • Pervious paving and landscaping allow water to be absorbed into the ground, percolating through natural filters and into aquifers. Impervious surfaces, such as sidewalks and roofs, force storm water to flow directly into the storm drain. This can lead to combined sewer overflow during times of significant rainfall. Additionally, excess storm water may collect contaminants prior to entering the storm drain, and depending on the location, may drain into natural waterways without being treated.
    >> Learn more about stormwater from the Environmental Protection Agency
  • eliminate waste

    Waste diversion is the process of diverting waste from the landfill. Landfills and waste incinerators can both be sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Ways to increase waste diversion include recycling, reusing, and source reduction.
    >> Search Waste Diversion on SFTool
  • toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials

    Non-toxic implies that a product, substance, or chemical will not cause adverse health effects, either immediately or over the long-term.
    >> Search Non-toxic on SFTool
  • integrated pest management

    Integrated Pest Management controls pests (plants, fungi, insects, and/or animals) in a way that protects human health and the surrounding environment and that improves economic returns through the most effective, least-risky option. This method involves the use of non-toxic options such as cleaning and physical barriers to pest entrance before resorting to chemical means.
    >> Explore the IEQ Whole Building System for more IPM guidance
  • procurement

    • Purchasing managers should create purchasing plans and programs that give preference to items containing recycled content, certified wood, and rapidly-renewable materials.
    • Energy efficient, non-toxic, durable, and locally manufactured, harvested and / or extracted items are desirable.
    • Purchasing managers should seek vendors who promote source reduction through reusable or minimal packaging of products.
    >> Explore the Green Products Compilation to learn about federal green purchasing requirements
  • use of chemicals

    • A successful Green Cleaning Plan limits the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemicals, ensures proper custodial effectiveness, and emphasizes the use of sustainable cleaning products and equipment.
    >> Explore the IEQ Whole Building System for more IPM guidance
  • advance regional and local integrated planning

    Environmentally responsible site selection:
    • discourage development of previously undeveloped land
    • minimizes a building's impact on ecosystems and waterways
    • encourages regionally appropriate landscaping
    • rewards smart transportation choices; and controls stormwater runoff
    >> Learn More about Sustainable Sites on SFTool
  • high performance

    Utilize the resources within SFTool to
    • Help identify & prioritize cost-effective green building strategies that lead to improved environmental performance in building projects.
    >> Identify & prioritize cost-effective green building strategies that lead to improved environmental performance in building projects at SFTool.gov
  • operation and management

    Ongoing facility management and operations drastically influence the facility's environmental impact. Explore whole building system O&M Green Tips and Strategies for best practices.
    >> Search Operation and Management on SFTool for additional guidance
  • Guiding Principles

    The Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings are a set of sustainable principles for integrated design, energy performance, water conservation, indoor environmental quality, and materials aimed at helping Federal agencies and organizations:
    • Reduce the total ownership cost of facilities
    • Improve energy efficiency and water conservation
    • Provide safe, healthy, and productive built environments
    • Promote sustainable environmental stewardship
    >> Learn more at the Whole Building Design Guide
  • vegetated roofs

    A vegetated roof is a layered system of growing medium (soil), filters, and waterproof membrane on the roof of a building. An entire roof can be converted into a planted roof or it can be done in parts. Planted roofs absorb heat instead of reflecting it, reducing Heat Island Effect. They can also serve as gardens and provide excellent insulation.
    >> Search Vegetated (Planted) Roof on SFTool
  • existing building systems

    Utilize the resources within SFTool to
    • Help identify & prioritize cost-effective green building strategies that lead to improved environmental performance in building projects.
    • Determine energy, water, and material-efficient renovation alternatives and compare materials.
    >> Explore SFTool.gov
  • sustainable acquisition

    • Create purchasing plans and programs that give preference to items containing recycled content, certified wood, and rapidly-renewable materials.
    • Select energy efficient, non-toxic, durable, and locally manufactured, harvested and / or extracted items.
    • Seek vendors who promote source reduction through reusable or minimal packaging of products.
    >> Explore the Green Products Compilation to discover federal green purchasing requirements
  • Energy Star

    ENERGY STAR is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. ENERGY STAR helps save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices.
    >> Learn more at ENERGY STAR
  • FEMP designated

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sets minimum energy efficiency requirements for product categories that have the potential to generate significant Federal energy savings.
    >> Learn more at FEMP
  • EPEAT

    EPEAT® is a comprehensive environmental rating system that makes it easy for purchasers to select environmentally preferable electronic products, and, in doing so, reward manufacturers for their environmental design efforts and create environmental benefits.
    >> Learn more on Environmental Programs at SFTool
  • enable power management

    • Reduce plug loads by implementing occupancy sensors and automatic shut-off switches
    • Default all copiers and printers to two-sided, quick-draft printer settings
    • Procure energy-saving certified electronic devices
    >> Explore office support and other areas for power management guidance
  • scope 2

    Direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the off-site generation of electricity, heat or steam purchased by a Federal Agency.
    >> Search Scope 2 GHG Emissions on SFTool
  • biobased

    A product or material derived from biological or renewable resources
    >> Learn more at the Whole Building Design Guide
  • scope 3

    Greenhouse gas emissions from sources not owned or directly controlled by a Federal agency but related to agency activities, such as vendor supply chains, delivery services, and employee travel and commuting.
    >> Search Scope 3 GHG Emissions on SFTool
  • scope 1 and 2

    Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the Federal Agency. Examples include natural gas and fuel oil burned on site.

    >> Search Scope 1 GHG Emissions on SFTool

    Direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the off-site generation of electricity, heat or steam purchased by a Federal Agency.

    >> Search Scope 2 GHG Emissions on SFTool
  • Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) designated

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sets minimum energy efficiency requirements for product categories that have the potential to generate significant Federal energy savings.
    >> Learn more at FEMP
  • environmentally preferable

    Environmentally preferable - products or services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose.
    >> Learn more at Environmentally preferable
  • non-toxic

    Non-toxic implies that a product, substance, or chemical will not cause adverse health effects, either immediately or over the long-term.
    >> Search Non-toxic on SFTool
  • water use efficiency and management

    • Sub-meter and monitor water use to detect and fix leaks in the system.
    • Commission water and sewer systems as part of the project quality assurance process.
    • Replace conventional fixtures with water-efficient plumbing fixtures
    • Adhere to all state and local ordinances with regards to water harvesting systems. Work together with legislators to find amiable alternatives.
    >> Explore the Water Whole Building System for more high-performance guidance

Hot Annotations

Hot annotations will appear here as you explore the document. Annotations contain valuable information about successfully putting policy into action.

  • Resources & Strategies
  • Definitions
  • Best Practices & Case Studies